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Professional DPT Program - Fort Lauderdale Campus

Curriculum Requirements

Note: Total credits for program = 119

course credits

PHY 5400 - Physiology 
The course is intended to provide students in the Physical Therapy Program with an understanding of the basic physio-chemical concepts and physiological principles underlying the development, maintenance and propagation of human life. It provides an examination of the physiological processes essential for students in the College of Health Care Sciences and reference to clinical applications is made where appropriate. Topics covered include basic examinations of cellular processes, membrane mechanisms, muscle physiology, the cardiovascular system, the nervous system, renal physiology, the respiratory system, endocrinology, reproductive physiology and gastrointestinal physiology.

3
ANA 5420: Anatomy
The study of structural and functional features of the human body in both lecture and cadaver lab format. The student will have an anatomical basis for understanding and applying information presented in basic science and clinical courses and for understanding clinical problems.
5
PHT 5610: Clinical Applications of Anatomy for Physical Therapists
Clinical Applications of Anatomy for Physical Therapists addresses anatomical knowledge specific to the practice of physical therapy. This course is an in-depth study of joint anatomy including muscular attachments, ligamentous structures, neural innervation, and contribution to movement. Palpation of key bony and soft-tissue structures will be introduced. Co-requisite: ANA 5420
2
PHT 5611: Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course introduces PT students to the physical therapy profession, its state and national associations, and the multiple roles assumed by physical therapists historically and in current practice. Students will grow professionally by utilizing relevant medical terminology, beginning the development of a student portfolio, and gaining familiarity with the core values and ethical standards for physical therapy. Professional standards for conduct are developed applying ethical principles, theories, the APTA Code of Ethics, and utilizing ethical decision-making. Students will gain a working knowledge of the more common state and federal laws, rules, and regulations that impact physical therapist practice, patient/client rights and responsibilities related to patient-centered care, and risk management strategies to avoid medical errors and to reduce legal liability. Cultural competency is introduced and promoted by student identification and exploration of own biases, diversity dimensions, and factors that affect health care outcomes. Students will start preparing for clinical experience by exploring the concepts of patient-client management, the ICF model, clinical-decision-making, therapeutic presence, and interprofessional education in health care.

3
Total: 13
course credits
PHT 6705: Essentials of Exercise Physiology, Health Promotion and Wellness
Exercise physiology describes the response to exercise and training on the cardiac, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, neural, and endocrine systems of the human body. Nutritional considerations as well as enhancing supplements will be discussed as they relate to exercise, athletics and physical therapy. The various methods of training for increased strength, hypertrophy, power, cardiovascular fitness, and endurance, and the effects of physical activities and work-related stress on the human organism will be discussed. Energy liberation, circulation and respiration, physical work capacity, physical training, energy cost of various activities, nutrition and performance, temperature regulation, factors affecting performance and fitness, and the physiology of various sport activities will be covered. Students will gain the knowledge required for designing exercise programs in the general and special populations based on established needs for function and performance. The course will also explore the professional role of physical therapists as advocates of health, wellness and prevention, including the following topics: Healthy People 2020 initiative, APTA's Vision 2020, wellness theory/models, dimensions of wellness, holistic versus conventional medicine, outcome measurements of wellness and quality of life, screening for health/fitness/wellness, and considerations for special populations. Upon completion of this course students are encouraged to prepare for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), Certified Strength and Conditioning Examination.
3

PHT 6710: Clinical Skills I
This course introduces students to basic Physical Therapy clinical examination, assessments and evaluation in accordance with the patient/client management model found in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Students will learn to safely interact and communicate with clients/patients, including history taking and documentation. The course will provide students with an understanding of cultural competence as an integral part of the clinical evaluation. An overview of documentation terms related to CPT-coding, ICD 9 & 10 coding and reimbursement will be provided. Safe performance of psychomotor skills such as assessing patient posture, vital signs, sensory assessment, positioning/draping, goniometry, manual muscle testing, functional mobility, gait assessment, assistive devices, and patient guarding and handling techniques will be emphasized. In partial fulfillment of this course, students will attend a service learning activity that has been pre-identified by faculty to supplement classroom and clinical education experiences. Service Learning experiences provide the student an opportunity to apply their knowledge and clinical skills to benefit the local community with follow-up reflection on the impact of their service.

4
PHT 6715: Essentials of Biomechanics and Kinesiology
This is a basic science course to introduce physical therapy students to the study of Biomechanics and Kinesiology. The students will integrate their anatomy knowledge of muscle and joint structure into the study of joint motion and functional movements. The course introduces the student to basic principles of biomechanics including kinetics, kinematics, and tissue biomechanics. Basic biomechanics serve as the foundation for understanding kinesiology. The study of kinesiology will be separated by body parts to include kinesiology of the upper extremity, kinesiology of the spine, and kinesiology of the lower extremity. Once the regional knowledge of kinesiology is understood, the final outcome of the course will be to facilitate learning and comprehension of complex kinesiologic analysis including gait, posture, and functional movements.
3
PHT 6717 Systems Management I: Medical Pathology and Pharmacology
This course provides an introductory overview of pathology, clinical pathology and pharmacology related to patient problems commonly seen by a physical therapists across the lifespan. The relationship between pathology and movement dysfunction will be emphasized and this relationship will be conceptualized within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Students will be introduced to normal immunity, tissue response to injury, healing processes, and the normal functioning of various body organs and systems. Students will also gain knowledge of signs and symptoms, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, prognosis, of selected pathological disorders. Medical and pharmacological management of selected disorders will be introduced and the effects of those interventions on the physical therapy management of the patient will be discussed. Course content will be delivered through a combination of video lectures, interactive live lectures, and readings. An emphasis will be placed on the development of the students’ early clinical reasoning abilities related to physical therapy patient management by integrating knowledge about the various pathologies into case based examples using the ICF model.
3

PHT 6722 Integumentary PT
The focus of the course is on the identification and management of integumentary pathologies obtained as primary injuries or as secondary complications of other diseases. Acute and chronic wound etiologies, burns, lymphedema and diseases with integumentary manifestations will be reviewed and discussed. Physical therapy management strategies and interventions- including soft tissue mobilization, biophysical agents, debridement, integumentary tests and measures, and patient education will be reviewed and practiced. The use of evidence-based practice to guide clinical decision-making will be emphasized.

2
Total: 15
course credits

ANA 5423: Neuroanatomy
This course will examine the structural, functional and developmental features of the human nervous system with reference to different disease states. It establishes an anatomical basis for the study and understanding of the nervous system as presented in the classroom and the lab. Application of these studies will help in the solving of problems encountered in your career as a future health care professional.

3

PHT 6700: Evidence-based Practice I: Introduction to Research Methods & Data Analysis
This course allows the learner to gain skill in reviewing research literature. It includes an overview of the principles of measurement, reliability and validity, an understanding of the four levels of measurement: nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio, research ethics, and critical literature analysis. It employs a creative, problem-solving experience during which you will develop a global understanding of the concepts and principles of research and begin to critically analyze healthcare research literature. The student will also begin to recognize the importance of and the role of research in clinical practice.

3
PHT 6707: Gerontology
Theories, research, and unique characteristics and behaviors related to aging, geriatric medicine, and physical therapy intervention will be explored in light of current healthcare trends, reimbursement, clinical practice and predictions. Students will gain an understanding of relevant laws impacting PT practice with elderly populations, the obligations of PTs with respect to suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation of elderly and dependent adults, and appropriately incorporate this content into interactions with patients/clients, facility staff, and administration.
1

PHT 6720: Clinical Skills II
This course presents models for clinical decision-making including the patient care management model as presented in the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice. This course includes interventions using therapeutic exercise including passive, active and resistive range of motion, strengthening programs, stretching exercises, soft tissue mobilization and gait training. Students will develop and write home programs, design exercise programs for therapeutic purposes, and critically analyze interventions. Students will learn to safely apply intervention techniques that address body structure/functional impairments in range of motion, musculoskeletal strength, gait deviations and activity limitations. Safe performance of psychomotor skills such as gait training, functional mobility, therapeutic exercises, and PNF will be emphasized. All sessions will be a combination of lecture, demonstration, interactive presentation, case study application, and psychomotor lab skill practice.

3

PHT 6721: The Healthcare Educator
Teaching is an integral part of physical therapy practice and one of the foundations of a doctoring profession. This course explores both the theoretical basis and the practical techniques related to patient-related instruction, designing educational programs/in-services, evaluating program/teaching effectiveness, facilitating behavior change, creating professional presentations, and engaging in clinical education. Students will also explore learning styles and factors that impact learning across the lifespan, and the many issues that impact patient education, from both a health care professional and management perspective. Adult education theory, patient/therapist interaction, communication barriers, strategies for success, web-based patient education, documentation, federal laws and initiatives and standards for patient education are some of the topics that will be examined. Knowledge and skills in teaching and learning are essential for successful outcome for any patient treatment or program. Students will have the opportunity to design their own educational program/tools, applying the principles and strategies covered in this class.

1
PHT 6725: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary PT
This course provides an overview of the related pathologies, diagnostic, and medical-surgical procedures of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Physiological principles of exercise will be applied to cardiovascular and pulmonary examination and intervention for given pathologies. Students will demonstrate PT cardiovascular and pulmonary examination, interventions, treatment planning, documentation, and outcome measurement across all clinical settings and explore interventions related to exercise, functional activities and airway clearance. The relevance of clinical laboratory values and medical/surgical diagnostics and interventions associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunctions will also be covered. Pre-requisites: PHT 6705 Exercise Physiology and PHT 6717 Systems Management I.
4
PHT 6814: Clinical Practicum I
The Clinical Practicum 1 course includes classroom instruction, integrated clinical education (ICE) experiences and concludes with a 4-week full-time clinical experience in the skilled nursing facility (SNF) setting. Classroom instruction focuses on orientation and preparation for both integrated and full-time clinical experiences. The ICE experiences employ a self-contained collaborative clinical education model in which academic faculty directly supervise students in a clinical setting. Students practice examination/evaluation, screening, and treatment skills learned in the curriculum concurrently and cumulatively throughout the course of the semester in underserved geriatric and other adult populations in an acute care hospital joint replacement unit, outpatient clinic and a skilled nursing facility. The course concludes with a 4-week full-time clinical education experience in the SNF setting with students directly supervised by community-based clinicians in a 1:1 or 2:1 model. The course focuses on application and integration of coursework to date including but not limited to Basic Medical Sciences, Clinical Anatomy, Clinical Skills, Cardiopulmonary, Integumentary, Gerontology, and Systems Management 1. The students will develop confidence and skills in professional behavior, clinical safety, communication, therapeutic presence, assessment, examination, screening, basic treatment planning, and performance of basic interventions, patient/client education, interprofessional collaborative practice, documentation and reimbursement/billing. Students will self-assess and reflect on their clinical performance. Academic and clinical faculty will provide students real-time feedback with formative and summative assessment regarding their clinical skills and professional behavior. In partial fulfillment of this course, students will complete pre-identified service-learning activities selected by faculty to supplement classroom and clinical education experiences. Service Learning experiences will provide the student an opportunity to apply their knowledge and clinical skills to benefit the local community with reflection on the impact of their service required following the activity.
3
Total: 18

Second Year Students

course credits

PHT 6810: Musculoskeletal I
This is the first of three courses designed to introduce the entry-level D.P.T. student to the elements of patient/client management in the orthopaedic setting. This course will emphasize the musculoskeletal system and follow both the sequence and nomenclature outlined in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice including examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and outcomes. Specific areas to be covered will include: communication and history taking, systems review, symptom physiology, selection and administering tests and measures, principles of manual therapy, soft tissue/myofascial intervention, extremity and spine mobilization (non-thrust), common disorders and injuries, musculoskeletal radiology, and principles of musculoskeletal disorder/injury management. Students will acquire the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills necessary to conduct a general musculoskeletal examination and perform interventions relevant to physical therapy practice. At completion of this course students will have acquired the requisite knowledge to learn advanced diagnoses and interventions covered in PHT 6820, PHT 6820(L), PHT 6821 and PHT 6821(L). Case studies will be utilized in conjunction with lecture, laboratory skill practice, and interactive teaching and learning methods to integrate didactic knowledge into real-life clinical scenarios.

2
PHT 6810L: Musculoskeletal I Lab
This course will emphasize the psychomotor and affective skills required when providing the associated musculoskeletal examination and interventions addressed in PHT 6810, Musculoskeletal I. Students are instructed and mentored in the selection and application of tests, measurements, and physical therapy interventions. Case studies are utilized in conjunction with interactive teaching and learning to assist students in integrating the techniques into simulated and real-life scenarios relevant to the musculoskeletal system. Co-requisite: PHT 6810
2
PHT 6815: Physical Agents
This course will emphasize both cognitive and psychomotor knowledge related to appropriate use of physical agents within the context of the Patient/Client Management Model of Physical Therapy Practice. Basic science information related to physiological effects, indications, and contra-indications for physical agents will be discussed. Course content will be delivered through classroom lectures, video demonstrations (student lead), and lab practice to facilitate integration of the didactic knowledge into simulated and real-life scenarios.
2
PHT 6817: Pediatrics I
This is the first of two pediatrics courses. This course introduces students to pediatrics as a specialty practice area in physical therapy. Students gain an understanding of typical infant and child development as it relates to movement. Typical development is presented in the context of applying current motor control theories to predictable developmental sequences, motor progressions, and achievement of motor milestones. Students become familiarized with commonly used pediatric screens, tests and measurements. Content is presented through lecture, lab, case studies, large and small group discussion, and community-based activities.
1
PHT 6807 Systems Management II: Medical Issues in High-Acuity Settings
This course is a continuation of PHT 6717 - Systems Management I, Medical Pathology and Pharmacology.  Systems Management II has a two-fold purpose: 1) to present those body system pathologies not covered in PHT 6717, and 2) to specifically address medical and treatment issues found in acute care settings. Renal, urologic, hepatic, pancreatic, biliary, and gastrointestinal systems will be presented first. Students will gain knowledge of signs/symptoms, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and pharmacological aspects of treatment related to disorders in these systems. The second half of the course addresses physical therapy examination and management of the acute care patient.  Included in this section are patient testing, condition diagnosis/prognosis, and patient disposition. Concomitant attention is given to issues of patient safety, management of the treatment environment, and proper use of specialized equipment. Treatment precautions, recognition of adverse responses, and emergency procedures will be emphasized. Case studies and laboratory sessions will focus on patient mobilization principles, inter-professional coordination of care, and acute non-surgical, acute post-surgical, and medically complicated patient management. Adding further depth to the course will be discussions of biopsychosocial and cultural factors affecting the rehabilitation process.
3
Total: 10
course credits
PHT 6802: Evidence-Based Practice II: Using Research to Inform Clinical Decision Making
In this course, students will be exposed to Sackett's model of evidence-based medicine in order to lay a foundation for understanding the global concept of evidence based practice (EBP). Students will learn to use the PICO format to ask clinically relevant questions. Students will learn to locate sources of evidence, evaluate the evidence, and make recommendations based on the evidence. Students will also rate an article based on the PEDro Scale and explore the concept of scientific misconduct.
3

PHT 6816: Neuroscience
In this course, students will acquire the foundational knowledge of human neurophysiology, motor control, and motor learning. Students will also learn the underlying neuropathology that manifests into clinical signs and symptoms of common neuromuscular dysfunctions, which is necessary for the physical therapy examination and management of patients with neuromuscular dysfunctions. Emphasis will also be placed on understanding of principles of normal human motor control, motor learning and its relation to movement dysfunctions resulting from common neuromuscular dysfunctions. The classroom learning of students will be facilitated using lecture, small and large group discussions, case studies, literature review and simulations. Course pre-requisite: ANA 5423: Neuroanatomy

3

PHT 6819: Pediatrics II
This course is the second part of a series which focuses on the physical therapy management and family-centered care for the pediatric patient/client. In Pediatrics I, students have gained an understanding of typical infant and child development related to movement, and how to use the ICF model as a framework to determine assessment/intervention needs and goals. Students also practiced observation and interaction skills through projects and lab experiences. Using this foundation, students in Pediatrics II will analyze movement dysfunction exhibited in high-risk infants and children who have common childhood pathologies. Atypical child motor dysfunction related to developmental delays, CNS damage, orthopedic conditions, respiratory conditions, sensory processing dysfunction, multisystem impairments, and congenital, neurological and neuromuscular disorders content is covered to promote critical thinking and establishment of appropriate physical therapy management principles. Students will become familiarized with commonly used pediatric tests and measurements. PT Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, and the ICF framework are applied in context. Management incorporating use/need for assistive devices, technologies, adapted equipment (i.e. wheelchair prescription and seating), orthotics, and bracing and use of newer interventions for the pediatric patient/client are presented. Delegation and supervision of support personnel, legal/ethical issues related to delivery of care, documentation, inter-professional team management, cultural issues, reimbursement, and patient/family and teacher education will be explored. Students will also have the opportunity to collaborate with students in other disciplines for case analysis and treatment planning. Content is presented through lecture, lab, case studies, large and small group discussion, and community-based activities. 

3
PHT 6820: Musculoskeletal II
Lecture (PHT 6820) - Students will acquire the skills needed to manage and prevent disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Students will address relevant practice patterns as they relate to the upper/lower quarter, diagnostic classifications, ICD-10 codes, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and interventions. Case studies are utilized in conjunction with lecture to assist students in integrating the didactic knowledge into simulated and real-life scenarios. Lab (PHT 6820L) - Emphasizes the psychomotor and affective skills required when providing the musculoskeletal interventions and tests addressed in PHT 6820. Students will acquire the psychomotor skills needed to manage and prevent disorders of the musculoskeletal system by addressing relevant practice patterns as they relate to the upper/lower quarter, ICD-10 codes, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and interventions related to these patterns.
3
PHT 6820L: Musculoskeletal II Lab
Emphasizes the psychomotor and affective skills required when providing the musculoskeletal interventions and tests addressed in PHT 6820. Students will acquire the psychomotor skills needed to manage and prevent disorders of the musculoskeletal system by addressing relevant practice patterns as they relate to the upper/lower quarter, ICD-9 codes, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and interventions related to these patterns. CO-REQUISITE: PHT 6820.
2
PHT 6824: Clinical Practicum II
This is a clinical education course utilizing a self-contained collaborative clinical education model where students are directly supervised in the clinic by academic faculty. Students concurrently practice examination/evaluation and treatment skills learned in the curriculum in outpatient settings including servicing underserved and/or underinsured adults. In partial fulfillment of this course, students will select and complete service learning activities that have been pre-identified by faculty to supplement classroom and clinical education experiences. Service Learning experiences will provide the student an opportunity to apply their knowledge and clinical skills to benefit the local community with follow-up reflection on the impact of their service.
1
Total: 15
course credits

PHT 6813: Gender Specific Issues in Physical Therapy
This course provides a review of diseases unique to the male and female body systems. Students will gain knowledge of gender specific pathologic processes associated with selected diseases as well as disease specific signs and symptoms. Common medical diagnostic and treatment approaches of gender specific conditions are discussed including both medical management and an introduction to physical therapy intervention. Changes to body systems during normal pregnancy will be discussed in addition to common pregnancy related musculoskeletal problems. Topics will include prostate disease, erectile dysfunction, pregnancy related movement dysfunction, pelvic floor dysfunction, male and female urinary and fecal incontinence, cancer management, lymphedema management, premenstrual dysphoric syndrome, female athlete triad, post-menopausal considerations and osteoporosis. Students will be exposed to entry level physical therapy examination techniques and interventions used to manage gender specific diseases, including recognition of key subjective or historical information that may warrant a pelvic floor examination or referral to another professional. Basic examination and intervention techniques will be practiced in a simulated environment.

2
PHT 6821: Musculoskeletal III
PHT 6821 is an evidence-based approach to the management of musculoskeletal disorders of the spine. Students will acquire the requisite skills necessary to examine, manage and prevent musculoskeletal impairments, functional limitations and disabilities of the spine. The course will address lumbar, thoracic, costal, cervical, sacroiliac, pelvis, temporomandibular and headache disorders. Students are prepared for entry-level patient /client management including the ability to perform an examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and the ability to select optimum interventions. Moreover, students will acquire the knowledge necessary to accurately disseminate information (verbal and written/documented) related to the examination and management of spine disorders to patients, clients and across the broad range of health care disciplines. Case studies are utilized in conjunction with lecture and interactive teaching and learning to assist students in integrating the didactic knowledge into simulated and real-life scenarios.
2
PHT 6821L: Musculoskeletal III Lab
PHT 6821L will emphasize the psychomotor and affective skills required when providing the associated musculoskeletal examination and interventions addressed in PHT 6821 Musculoskeletal III. Students are instructed and mentored in the selection and application of tests, measurements and physical therapy interventions. Case studies are utilized in conjunction with interactive teaching and learning to assist students in integrating the techniques into simulated and real-life scenarios relevant to the musculoskeletal system. Co-requisite: PHT 6821.
2
PHT 6830: Neuromuscular I
Neuromuscular Systems I addresses the examination and interventions for adults with neuromuscular disorders. Students will apply knowledge from Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience to the clinical management of patients with neurological conditions. Neuromuscular Systems 1 provides the foundational concepts and clinical reasoning for choosing tests and measures used during the PT examination of the neurological patient, including sensory and motor tests; examination of motor function; motor learning, coordination; cranial nerves; functional mobility; self-care and activities of daily living; community function; arousal, attention and cognition; balance, gait, and disease-specific tests. The foundational concepts for procedural interventions related to neurorehabilitation will be addressed, including indications, precautions, contraindications and evidence-based recommendations for: therapeutic exercise; balance and gait retraining; manual techniques and facilitation; electric stimulation; mobility training; upper extremity reach, grasp, and manipulation training; positioning, supportive, and protective devices; wheelchair and community re-entry. Course pre-requisites: ANA 5423: Neuroanatomy and PHT 6816: Neuroscience.
3
PHT 6830L: Neuromuscular I Lab
This course is the laboratory component of Neuromuscular Systems I which addresses the psychomotor skills needed for the examination and treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. The students will be exposed to a variety of clinical tests and measures including: patient history; sensory testing (superficial, deep, and cortical sensations) by both peripheral nerve distribution and dermatome; myotome and manual muscle testing; motor function and coordination testing; balance, gait, and mobility testing; arousal, attention, and cognitive tests; environmental, home, and work/play barriers; self care and home management (including ADL's and IADL testing); job/school/play reintegration testing; and assistive/adaptive device testing. Disease specific tests and measures will also be performed. Psychomotor treatment skills will include: balance and gait training, including body weight supported treadmill training; therapeutic exercise to improve muscle performance, mobility, balance and coordination for the neurological patient; functional training, self-care and home management in ADL's, IADL's, and work/play integration; manual therapy techniques, positioning, and facilitation; prescription and application of assistive and supportive devices; as well as physical agents and electrotherapeutic modalities. Course pre-requisites: ANA 5423: Neuroanatomy and PHT 6816: Neuroscience.
2
PHT 6835: Systems Management III: Medical Screening and Differential Diagnosis for Physical Therapists
This course provides students the opportunity to develop their skills in identifying patients with medical conditions outside the scope of physical therapy practice, and to identify comorbidities and external factors that affect patient response to physical therapy treatment. The focus of this course is on the development of the skill of differential diagnosis as practiced by the physical therapist. This will be accomplished through the evaluation of information gained during the examination processes of intake, history, and physical examination; and the evaluation of a patient’s response to physical therapy treatment. The synthesis of this information will be combined with the student’s knowledge of medical pathology of the various systems, to allow for an understanding of when a patient should be referred to another healthcare provider and when the patient is appropriate for physical therapy treatment. The differential diagnosis considered in this course will assist in differentiating between musculoskeletal system dysfunction and medical pathologies of all systems, including the musculoskeletal system. The identification and effects of cognitive-behavioral influences on patient management and patient prognosis will also be considered. This course emphasizes the ability to identify the presence of these conditions, and identify when referral to another healthcare practitioner is required or when specific considerations should be made in the approach of physical therapy treatment.  COURSE PRE-REQUISITES: PHT 6810 MS I and PHT 6717 Medical Pathology for the Physical Therapist.
3
PHT 6834: Clinical Practicum III
This course includes classroom instruction, integrated clinical education (ICE) experiences and concludes with a 4-week full-time intermediate clinical education experience in an outpatient orthopedic setting. Classroom instruction focuses on orientation and preparation for both integrated and full-time clinical experiences. The ICE experiences employ a self-contained collaborative clinical education model in which academic faculty directly supervise students in the clinic. Students practice examination/ evaluation and treatment skills learned in the curriculum concurrently and cumulatively throughout the course of the semester in outpatient settings. The 4-week full-time intermediate clinical education experience is a community-based experience in an adult outpatient setting (primarily musculoskeletal), in which community-based clinicians directly supervise students in a 1:1 or 2:1 model. The course focuses on refining and implementing skills based upon application and integration of coursework to date, including but not limited to: Basic Medical Sciences, Clinical Anatomy, Clinical Skills, Cardiopulmonary, Integumentary, Gerontology, Systems Management, Musculoskeletal, and Neuromuscular I. Students will develop confidence and competency in professional behavior, clinical safety, communication, therapeutic presence, assessment, examination, screening, treatment planning and performance of skill interventions, patient/client education, interprofessional collaborative practice, documentation and reimbursement/billing. Students will self-assess and reflect on their clinical performance. Academic and clinical faculty will provide students real-time feedback along with formative and summative assessment regarding their clinical skills and professional behavior. In partial fulfillment of this course, students will complete pre-identified service-learning activities selected by faculty to supplement classroom and clinical education experiences. Service Learning experiences will provide the student an opportunity to apply their knowledge and clinical skills to benefit the local community with reflection on the impact of their service required following the activity.
2
Total: 16

Third Year Students

Course Credits
PHT 6823: The Business of Physical Therapy
Potential opportunities and career paths that can lead to mid-level and executive management positions for physical therapists are presented in the context of the complex world of contemporary health-care organizations and their unique business models. Current issues that impact the roles of leaders and managers and their responsibilities in different types of health care settings/environments are presented. Regulatory, economic and financial responsibilities of the physical therapy manager in the utilization of human and material resources within a variety of healthcare environments will also be explored. Students will prepare a feasibility study or business plan for a new physical therapy practice or program.
3
PHT 6906: Clinical Education Experience Orientation

This course will include all final preparation necessary for the students to begin their Clinical Education Experience series. In the orientation course, students complete compliance requirements, and review behavior and professional expectations during clinic time. Students are also oriented to the weekly reporting and assessment tools that will be utilized during the Clinical Education Experience series, including the CPI instrument. Students also develop initial goals and communication strategies for the clinical series.

0
PHT 6914: Neuromuscular II
Neurological Systems II integrates concepts from Neuroscience and Neuromuscular Systems I to engage students in the patient/client management of patients with neuromuscular dysfunction. Students are exposed to a variety of case studies, representing all adult neuromuscular practice patterns in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, in order to integrate and apply previous learned neuromuscular skills to patient scenarios. Emphasis is placed on clinical reasoning during all steps of patient/client management; the ability to apply evidence in practice; design and execution of patient/client related instruction; delegation to support personnel; and documentation of all aspects of care. This class also addresses primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention for patients with neuromuscular conditions.
2
PHT 6914L: Neuromuscular II Lab
This course is the laboratory component of Neuromuscular II, in which students will perform all aspects of patient/client management including examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, development of a plan of care, procedural interventions, and outcome measurement. Students will apply these techniques to a variety of case studies, representing the scope of adult practice patterns in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Neuromuscular Systems II culminates in a one week intense laboratory experience, the Neuro Boot Camp (NI), in which students work with real patients who have complicated neuromuscular disorders in a faculty-supervised setting. Students are responsible to perform a thorough examination, write a comprehensive plan of care, perform procedural interventions and patient instruction, and communicate with caregivers.
2
PHT 6915: Prosthetics & Orthotics
In this course, students will acquire the skills necessary to evaluate need, analyze pathological gait, develop a plan of care, and treat patients for whom prosthetic or orthotic devices are indicated from a medical or rehabilitation standpoint. Students will learn how to manage movement-related problems in patients with amputations because of diabetes, burns, trauma, cancer, and genetic conditions. They will learn about the components, fabrication, and application of upper and lower extremity prosthetic and orthotic devices, and spinal orthoses. The course includes a full-day laboratory experience in which students work with real patients with amputations in a faculty-supervised setting. Students will also explore the contemporary literature to facilitate an evidence-based approach to orthotic and prosthetic rehabilitation.
3

PHT 6920: Systems Management IV: Applied Clinical Decision Making 
Students apply problem solving heuristics, analyze case-presentations of multifactor movement dysfunction, synthesize patient problem-lists from collected data, develop intervention strategies, and evaluate the outcome of assessment and intervention decisions. The course integrates material from the foundational medical and clinical sciences and student clinical experiences. Accordingly students are provided opportunities to demonstrate differential diagnosis and treatment planning across the lifespan as well as to select and justify interventions, recommend referrals, and establish discharge dispositions. Student learning and course-participation is driven by mock and real clinical cases and clinical experiences. Content experts guide cognitive domain discussion and the decision-making process, assess the affective domain and compliance with professional ethical standards, and evaluate complex overt performance of psychomotor tasks. Students will develop initial plans for examination and assessment, perform assessments, analyze and interpret test results, prepare written intervention plans, perform interventions, and suggest potential outcome assessments. Students will justify and modify treatment plans to account for changes in the patients' status. In addition, students will prepare and present a clinical case-report to the assembled class at the conclusion of the term. Topics for the clinical cases and clinical experiences will cover a broad spectrum of conditions seen by physical therapists in the clinical setting.

4
Total: 14
course credits
PHT 6917: Clinical Education Experience A

The Clinical Education Experience series consists of three consecutive, full-time, supervised clinical education experiences for senior DPT students. Students are provided with the opportunities to practice clinical decision-making based on evidence, and develop entry-level physical therapy skills for patient/client management in inpatient and outpatient settings. Students will apply their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors, in various community-based settings representative of the common practice settings in which physical therapists work. Clinical Education Experiences encompass campus orientation in the summer of year 3, followed by a total of 32 weeks of full-time clinical education during fall and winter semesters. Students will typically rotate through three clinical placements; 10, 12 and 10 weeks, in a variety of health care organizations; schedule modifications may be made to accommodate facility requirements or other needs. The goal of all placements is for student achievement of entry-level competency and professional behaviors in all settings. Students must complete at least one experience in: an acute care/inpatient or the equivalent such as an LTACH; subacute inpatient or out-patient with a neuro-rehabilitation component; and outpatient. During the full-time experiences, students will focus on patient/client management models by performing patient examinations, evaluations, determining diagnoses, prognoses, and interventions (POC) within the context of the clinical setting utilizing the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. It is expected that through the Clinical Experiences, students will demonstrate appropriate management skills of patient/clients across adulthood or lifespan and across the continuum of care commonly seen in physical therapy practice. They will also demonstrate progressively greater independence in effectively managing less medically complex to more medically complex patients in each practice setting. Students are expected to demonstrate: effective communication and documentation skills; professionalism consistent with the APTA core values; cultural competence; and, ethical and legal practice.

5
PHT 6927: Clinical Education Experience B

This is the second of 3 senior full-time clinical experiences. Students will complete an extended experience in multifaceted healthcare organizations with the goal of bringing their skills to entry-level for both inpatient and outpatient care. Students may also have the opportunity to complete an experience in a specialty area in physical therapy practice. See PHT 6917: Clinical Education Experience A

6
Total: 11
course credits
PHT 6937: Clinical Education Experience C

This is the second of 3 senior full-time clinical experiences. Students will complete an extended experience in multifaceted healthcare organizations with the goal of bringing their skills to entry-level for both inpatient and outpatient care. Students may also have the opportunity to complete an experience in a specialty area in physical therapy practice. See PHT 6917: Clinical Education Experience A

5

PHT 6947: Wrap-up
This course is offered at the completion of the student’s clinical and didactic course work. Students participate in a hybrid format, online and on-campus review of the curriculum leading to the comprehensive examination. Activities include online review modules, self-assessment and practice examinations. Debriefing of the clinical education experiences takes place when students return to campus and students participate in summative assessment of the curriculum and preparation for employment as a physical therapist. The comprehensive examination is also held when the students return to campus.

2
Total: 7
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