Advance Your Career as a Leader in Respiratory Care

As a practicing Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) you’re already aware of the critical role you play in helping people with an essential function of life—breathing. Now that you’ve had an opportunity to work in this rewarding health care field, you’re ready to take the next step. The field is changing and to advance on the professional ladder, you need an advanced education. Nova Southeastern University’s post-professional respiratory therapy program makes it convenient for working professionals like you to become leaders. 

NSU’s Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Therapy (BSRT) is an online program where you’ll dive deeper into subjects such as sleep medicine, legal issues and evidence-based practice. As a fully online student at NSU you’ll still receive continuous support from your instructors. You’ll have 24/7 access to lectures and materials that fit your schedule. Your practical fieldwork (practicum, internship or scientific investigations) allow you to explore new fields and cutting-edge topics.

Why Should You Major in Respiratory Therapy at NSU?

Explore Exciting Opportunities in one of the Most In-Demand Health Care Fields

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that employment of respiratory therapists will grow 19 percent from 2019 to 2029. With your BSRT, you can open the door to even more opportunities and higher roles within the field, including those in management, research or education.

Learn more about Career Preparation

Average Starting Salary

According to Salary.com, the average annual salary for registered respiratory therapists with a bachelor’s degree ranges from $66,781 to $70,235.

Shark Destinations

You’ll find alumni of NSU’s respiratory therapy program at health care facilities like Holtz Children's Hospital and Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital.*

 *Data provided by NSU’s Office of Career Development.

 

The World Needs More RTs

Aging populations, greater access to health insurance, advancements in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics, and respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19 — all of these factors are creating an enormous demand for respiratory therapists.

Lori Tinkler, National Board for Respiratory Care CEO