Become an Anesthesiologist Assistant: CAAHEP-Accredited A.A. Program

While all Anesthesiologist Assistant (AA) programs strive to prepare you for board certification and practice, only Nova Southeastern University (NSU) AA programs rise above the rest as national standouts. Here’s how to become an Anesthesiologist Assistant with the added expertise and confidence to stand out amongst your peers:

Accelerate Your Learning: Leading-Edge Tech

  • Only program in the U.S. with four high-fidelity anesthesia simulators
  • Two fully functional operating rooms with high-fidelity simulation training
  • Adult and pediatric human patient simulators
  • Medical exam rooms
  • Highly equipped regional anesthesia labs
  • Preoperative and postoperative labs
  • Dedicated course and lab in regional anesthesia techniques

#1 in U.S. for Clinical Rotation Choices

  • More rotation sites than any A.A. program in the U.S.
  • Clinical rotation opportunities in various countries outside U.S.

More 1:1 Faculty Mentoring

  • Class size strictly limited so professors can give you more individualized support
  • Every professor is a licensed Anesthesiologist or Certified Anesthesiologist Assistant
  • All have built successful clinical practices, in addition to their specialized educator skills

 

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Quick Facts

Delivery Options

Offered on NSU’s Fort Lauderdale, Tampa Bay, and Jacksonville, Florida campuses as well as Denver, Colorado.

Start Dates

The Florida NSU AA programs begin each May. The Denver program begin each January.

Tuition

Visit the Tuition and Fees page for more information.

Credit Hours

The M.S. in Anesthesia Degree is 117 credit hours and is a 27-month program.

Testimonials

NSU is excited to be the largest educator of Anesthesiologist Assistants in the country with four programs located in Ft. Lauderdale, Tampa and Jacksonville, Florida and Denver, Colorado . We always maintain a low faculty to student ratio to ensure that our students get the one-to-one faculty attention you expect from a professional graduate program.

Dr. Robert Wagner, chair Department of Anesthesia

My success with the program is mostly due to my relationships with the faculty. They were so accessible and I was able to have such a close relationship with them...that made me very comfortable and prepared me for my clinical year.

Giselle Rivero, Miami

Why Choose NSU?


  • State-of-the-art training facilities
  • Smaller classes/individualized attention
  • Students' educational experience will be enhanced by two of the largest, fully-functional operating rooms

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Meet the AA Faculty and Staff

Denver Fort Lauderdale Jacksonville Tampa

Fast Facts

Important Tips Before You Apply

Please note that there is only one application required you’ll need to submit as part of the A.A. program admissions process. Submit your  CASAA application.

Prefer to speak with someone directly?

Denver

Email Kandee Griffith, your Admissions Counselor, or call at (904) 245-8913.

Fort Lauderdale

Email Coralie Berard, your Admissions Counselor, or call at (954) 262-1124.

Jacksonville

Email Kandee Griffith, your Admissions Counselor, or call at (904) 245-8913.

Orlando

Email Renee San Giacomo, your Admissions Counselor, or call at (239) 274-6952

Tampa Bay

Email Aaliyyah Dyani, your Admissions Counselor, or call at (813)-574-5278.

Download Resources

Master of Science in Anesthesia Brochure - Fort Lauderdale

Master of Science in Anesthesia Brochure - Tampa Bay

Master of Science in Anesthesia Brochure - Jacksonville

Master of Science in Anesthesia Brochure - Denver

M.S. in Anesthesia: Program Details

The Master of Science in Anesthesia program has partnered with the Central Application Service for Anesthesiologist Assistants ( CASAA), to collect and manage applications to the Anesthesiologist Assistant Program. The Florida NSU AA programs matriculate students once per year each May. The Denver NSU AA program matriculates students once per year each January.

The following application process is required of all  applicants:

1) Submit a CASAA application along with the required fee before the specified deadline. Each NSU AA program requires applicants to complete a separate CASAA application.

2) Submit all supplemental documentation directly to CASAA by specified deadline. 

Please note that  applications will not undergo review until the CASAA application is verified,and supplemental documents are received.

Important Dates

All Florida AA Programs (Ft. Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Orlando and Tampa)
CASAA Application Dates June 15 - January 15
Orlando CASAA APPLICATION

PENDING

(Check back regularly for updated inforomation)

GRE/MCAT Score Submission Deadline

CASAA GRE CAMPUS CODES:
  • Fort Lauderdale - 7154
  • Jacksonville - 4784
  • Orlando- PENDING
  • Tampa Bay - 7149
    • Competitive GRE scores range in the 40th percentile or higher.
    • Competitive MCAT scores range from 500 and above.
January 15

Effective for 2024-2025 CASAA cycle, ONLY the Ft. Lauderdale AA program only is requiring the CASPER exam. 

The NSU Fort Lauderdale Anesthesiologist Assistant program requires all applicant to complete a Casper assessment. Students applying to the Fort Lauderdale program will have the opportunity to submit their Casper assessment with their CASAA application for admissions review. The Casper assessment is a unique tool currently being utilized by graduate health professional programs nationwide with the intention and focus on supplementing prospective candidate strengths and suitability for graduate study.  To register for the Casper exam, visit https://acuityinsights.app/casper/. All test results must be received by January15. 

Denver AA Program

CASAA Application Dates March - October 1

GRE/MCAT Score Submission Deadline

CAASA GRE CODE: 3121
October 1

The Admissions Committee begins interviews as early as September of the preceding year. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply as soon as the CASAA application opens to afford the best opportunity to receive an interview.

 

Application Procedures

  1. Apply to CASAA.
  2. Send supporting documents, including official test scores, letters of recommendation, official transcripts, shadowing experiences, literature summary reviews, and resumes, to CASAA by designated deadline. 

    NOTE: A NSU Supplemental Application is no longer required.

Prospective Master of Science in Anesthesia students are selected by the Committee on Admissions (COA), which considers the overall qualities of the applicant. Areas of consideration include interpersonal skills, personal motivation, knowledge and understanding of the AA profession and the Anesthesia Care Team, academic performance and level of achievement, life experiences, and recommendations. Personal interviews are offered to the most qualified applicants to assess interpersonal and communication skills, altruistic attitude, maturity, and commitment to the AA profession and anesthesia care team model.  

  1. Baccalaureate degree from a nationally recognized and regionally accredited college or university, including above average performance in courses required in a premed curriculum. (Refer to required courses below.

    Effective January 2024, all incoming students for winter 2025 and summer 2025, must take a general Anatomy and Physiology I and II course with labs or Human Anatomy with lab and Human Physiology with lab for eight (8) semester hours.

  2. Complete required prerequisite courses. 

    1. Note: a "C" or better is required in all prerequisite classes (there is no expiration date for prerequisite courses). In order to meet pre-requisite requirements, math and science courses must include sufficient rigor and detail in the discipline.

      Introductory, survey, or business courses will not satisfy the requirements.

     

    Required Prerequisites Semester Hours

    Anatomy and Physiology I (A & P I) with Lab and Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab (A & P II)  
    OR 
    Human Anatomy with Lab and Physiology with Lab

    8 semester hours
    Chemistry I and II with Labs 8 semester hours
    Biochemistry 3 semester hours
    Organic Chemistry I with Lab 4 semester hours

    Physics I and II with labs
    (Trigonometry, Pre-calculus or Calculus based)

    *Algebra based college physics does not meet requirements & will not be accepted*

    8 semester hours
    English Composition or a Literature Course 3 semester hours
    Calculus  3 semester hours

    Please note the following courses are NOT REQUIRED but suggested.

    Preferred Courses - Not Required Semester Hours
    Biology I and II with Labs 8 semester hours
    Biochemistry Lab 1 semester hour
    Cellular and Molecular Biology 3 semester hours
    Microbiology with Lab 4 semester hours
    Organic Chemistry II with Lab 4 semester hours
    AP and IB credits are acceptable if they are listed with course subject name and earned semester hours on official transcripts.

  3. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work. (Please see item number 11 regarding foreign transcripts and courses.)  

  4. Applicants must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 grading scale. A minimum GPA of 3.2 is preferred. 

  5. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) scores must have been taken with the past five years and must be taken early enough for official scores to be received by admissions office by the application deadline of January 15 (October 15 for Denver AA program). Information can be obtained from the GRE website and the MCAT website.

  6. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's prior academic performance, potential, character, work habits, and suitability for graduate study leading into a career in clinical practice.

  7. At least eight hours of documented anesthesia exposure by observation in the operating room.

  8. Summary of an article published in a current anesthesia journal.

  9. All applicants must show evidence of computer skills through coursework or self-study prior to the end of the first semester. Students may obtain instruction through the NSU Student Microcomputer Laboratory or other training facilities.

  10. The applicant who has graduated from a college or university of a country for which English is not the primary language, regardless of United States’ residency status, must take the computerized Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). An official set of scores must be sent directly from the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, to NSU’s EPS.

  11. Coursework taken at a foreign institution must be evaluated for U.S. institutional equivalence. A course by course with GPA calculation official transcript evaluation is required. Foreign coursework must be evaluated by one of the following services:

    Josef Silny & Associates, Inc.
    International Education Consultants
    7101 SW 102nd Avenue
    Miami, FL 33173
    Phone: (305) 273-1616
    Fax: (305) 273-1338
    www.jsilny.com

    Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc.
    P.O. Box 415070
    Milwaukee, WI 53203
    (414) 289-3400
    www.ece.org

    World Education Services, Inc.
    P.O. Box 745
    Old Chelsea Station
    New York, NY 10113-0745
    (212) 966-6311
    www.wes.org 

    Send official foreign transcript evaluations to CASAA and also electronically to electronictranscript@nova.edu or via U. S. mail to

    Nova Southeastern University
    Attn: EPS
    P .O. Box 29900
    3301 College Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-9905

 

Applicants seeking to enhance their application and scientific knowledge may be interested in our Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Pre-Anesthesiologist Assistant Studies. With a fall program start,this two-semester certificate program has limited enrollment, and to apply, candidates must have previously submitted a CASAA application to NSU during the last year's admission cycle. The program aims to provide a platform for demonstrating the academic excellence and acquiring the skills essential for admission into the Anesthesiologist Assistant program.

Note: Curriculum is subject to change as directed by the department.

Semester I

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 5048: Medical Terminology
This is a self-study, online course. Use of medical language for appropriate and accurate communication in patient care. Course includes terminology and symbols, word formation, body systems and disease terms, abbreviations, and procedures.
1
ANES 5081: Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia
Prepares and educates the student to work within the anesthesia care team. Introduction to induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia. Includes history of anesthesia, types of anesthesia, universal precautions and infection control, layout of the operating room, sterile fields and techniques, interacting with patients, starting intravenous catheters and arterial cannulae, obtaining arterial blood samples, and application of ASA-standard monitors. Students will use an anesthesia simulator to gain the basic knowledge and usage of monitors.
2
ANES 5301: Anesthesia Laboratory I
A state-of-the-art laboratory and anesthesia simulator will prepare the student for the usage and complete understanding of the monitors and practice of anesthesia. Students will apply their didactic knowledge to scenarios on the anesthesia simulator. Patient modalities—such as pulse oximetry, capnography, and blood pressure monitoring systems—are explored. Laboratory experiments will develop students’ understanding of anesthesia delivery systems, various types of breathing circuits, fresh gas flow effect, theory of dilutional methods of cardiac output monitoring, and relations between mean circulatory filling pressures and central venous pressure. A vascular sonography lab will allow a unique and comprehensive understanding of transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
3
ANES 5328: ECG for Anesthesiologist Assistants
This course presents a comprehensive approach to perioperative emergency and advanced cardiac life support, including monitoring, interpretation, and management of pathologic conditions affecting the circulatory and pulmonary systems. Relevant anatomy, physiology, neurophysiology, pharmacology, and medical equipment will be included. Emphasis is placed on rhythm strip analysis and evidenced-based perioperative applications.
2
PHS 5400: Physiology
Clinically relevant physiologic principles of the major organ systems covered in Anatomy. Pathological changes that occur in the human physiology in the disease process.
4
ANA 5420: Anatomy
Gross structures of the human body. Integrates topographic and radiographic anatomy to stress the application and importance of clinical anatomy. Develops the knowledge of the human anatomy necessary for the practice of the profession.
4
ANES 5621: Principle of Airway Management I
This course will provide an opportunity to learn and appreciate structure, function, pathophysiology, disease, and management of the human airway. The basic and advanced principles of elective and emergent airway management, including equipment and techniques, will be covered. Examination, recognition, techniques, and management involved in pediatric and adult difficult airways will be discussed. Course will correlate with laboratory work for a better understanding and use of bag/ mask ventilation, oral and nasal airways, oral and nasal intubation techniques, lightwands, fiberoptic intubations, double lumen tubes, surgical airways, and application of laryngeal mask airway.
2
Total: 18

Semester II

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 5302: Anesthesia Laboratory II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5301. A state-of-the-art laboratory and anesthesia simulator will prepare the student for the usage and complete understanding of the monitors and practice of anesthesia. Students will apply their didactic knowledge to scenarios on the anesthesia simulator. Patient modalities—such as pulse oximetry, capnography, and blood pressure monitoring systems—are explored. Laboratory experiments will develop students’ understanding of anesthesia delivery systems, various types of breathing circuits, fresh gas flow effect, theory of dilutional methods of cardiac output monitoring, and 206 College of Health Care Sciences—Department of Anesthesia relations between mean circulatory filling pressures and central venous pressure. A vascular sonography lab will allow a unique and comprehensive understanding of transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
3
ANES 5462: Pharmacology for Anesthesia I
Emphasizes drugs specifically related to the practice of anesthesia, including inhaled anesthetics, opioids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, anticholinesterases and anticholinergics, neuromuscular blockers, adrenergic agonists and antagonists, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, antidysrhythmics, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, anticoagulants, antihistamines, and antimicrobials.
2
ANES 5601: Applied Physiology for Anesthesia Practice I
Pathophysiology in a systems approach—cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, neuro, metabolic, and endocrine. Emphasizing hemodynamics, Starling forces, pulmonary responses, renal hemodynamics, temperature regulation, blood gases/pH, and maternal and fetal physiology. Also emphasizes those systems that affect evaluation and planning for anesthesia and that are affected by the administration of anesthesia.
3
ANES 5622: Principle of Airway Management II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5621. This course will provide an opportunity to learn and appreciate structure, function, pathophysiology, disease, and management of the human airway. The basic and advanced principles of elective and emergent airway management, including equipment and techniques, will be covered. Examination, recognition, techniques, and management involved in pediatric and adult difficult airways will be discussed. Course will correlate with laboratory work for a better understanding and use of bag/mask ventilation, oral and nasal airways, oral and nasal intubation techniques, lightwands, fiberoptic intubations, double lumen tubes, surgical airways, and application of laryngeal mask airway.
2
ANES 5801: Instrumentation and Monitoring
Practical principles, application, and interpretation of various monitoring modalities including ECG, invasive and noninvasive blood pressure, oximetry, cardiac output, respiratory gas analysis, respiration, and instrumentation as they pertain to anesthesia practice. Also includes intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring, temperature, renal function, coagulation/hemostasis, neuromuscular junction, transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
2
ANES 5901: Anesthesia Principle and Practices I
Principles involved in the formulation of anesthetic plans based upon data obtained during the preoperative evaluation. Includes the formulation and practices of different anesthetic plans and techniques as related to specific surgical procedures and pathophysiology.
2
ANES 5104: Principles of Life Support*
This course provides for the certification of Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). It will focus on the assessment and management of adults, children, and infants in cardiopulmonary crisis. ACLS and PALS certification will be obtained during this semester.
3
MHS 5205: Writing for Medical Publication 3
Total: 20

* Basic Life Support Certification and Advanced Cardiac Lifesaving will be obtained during this semester

Semester III

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 5001: Clinical Anesthesia I
Developmental skills and foundations of the clinical practice of anesthesia are gained through one-on-one supervised instruction in the operating room and other ancillary anesthetizing locations. Participation and responsibilities increase through the year as knowledge and skills develop.
3
ANES 5303: Anesthesia Laboratory III
This course is a continuation of ANES 5302. A state-of-the-art laboratory and anesthesia simulator will prepare the student for the usage and complete understanding of the monitors and practice of anesthesia. Students will apply their didactic knowledge to scenarios on the anesthesia simulator. Patient modalities—such as pulse oximetry, capnography, and blood pressure monitoring systems—are explored. Laboratory experiments will develop students’ understanding of anesthesia delivery systems, various types of breathing circuits, fresh gas flow effect, theory of dilutional methods of cardiac output monitoring, and relations between mean circulatory filling pressures and central venous pressure. A vascular sonography lab will allow a unique and comprehensive understanding of transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
3
ANES 5463: Pharmacology for Anesthesia II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5462. Emphasizes drugs specifically related to the practice of anesthesia, including inhaled anesthetics, opioids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, anticholinesterases and anticholinergics, neuromuscular blockers, adrenergic agonists and antagonists, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidysrhythmics, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, anticoagulants, antihistamines, and antimicrobials.
2
ANES 5602: Applied Physiology for Anesthesia Practice II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5601. Pathophysiology in a systems approach—cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, neuro, metabolic, and endocrine. Emphasizing hemodynamics, Starling forces, pulmonary responses, renal hemodynamics, temperature regulation, blood gases/pH, and maternal and fetal physiology. Also emphasizes those systems that affect evaluation and planning for anesthesia and that are affected by the administration of anesthesia.
3
ANES 5802: Instrumentation and Monitoring II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5801. Practical principles, application, and interpretation of various monitoring modalities, including ECG, invasive blood pressure, oximetry, cardiac output, respiratory gas analysis, respiration, and instrumentation, as they pertain to anesthesia practice will be discussed. The course also includes intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring, temperature, renal function, coagulation/hemostasis, neuromuscular junction, transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
2
ANES 5902: Anesthesia Principle and Practices II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5901. Principles involved in the formulation of anesthetic plans based upon data obtained during the preoperative evaluation. Includes the formulation and practices of different anesthetic plans and techniques as related to specific surgical procedures and pathophysiology.
2
ANES 5101: Student Lecture Series I
This course provides the opportunity for students to explore a special topic of interest under the direction of a faculty member. Arrangements are made directly with the appropriate faculty member and the program director. Topic exploration is governed by the needs of the program and the educational goal of the student. Possible topics involve clinical and nonclinical aspects of the practice of medicine in the United States.
1
Total: 16

Minimum clinical experience: 150 hours (anesthesia rotations in hospital)

Semester IV

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 5000: Professional Issues in Anesthesiologist Assistant Practice
This course examines the current professional and ethical issues that exist within the health care industry associated with the practice of anesthesia and patient care. Course topics include beneficence, non-maleficence, and respect for autonomy, as well as political and legal issues contained in closed claims examinations and current issues regarding anesthesiologist assistant practice.
2
ANES 5002: Clinical Anesthesia II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5001. Developmental skills and foundations of the clinical practice of anesthesia are gained through one-on-one supervised instruction in the operating room and other ancillary anesthetizing locations. Participation and responsibilities increase through the year as knowledge and skills develop.
3
ANES 5304: Anesthesia Laboratory IV
This course is a continuation of ANES 5303. A state-of-the-art laboratory and anesthesia simulator will prepare the student for the usage and complete understanding of the monitors and practice of anesthesia. Students will apply their didactic knowledge to scenarios on the anesthesia simulator. Patient modalities—such as pulse oximetry, capnography, and blood pressure monitoring systems—are explored. Laboratory experiments will develop students’ understanding of anesthesia delivery systems, various types of breathing circuits, fresh gas flow effect, theory of dilutional methods of cardiac output monitoring, and relations between mean circulatory filling pressures and central venous pressure. A vascular sonography lab will allow a unique and comprehensive understanding of transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, cerebrovascular testing, and venous and peripheral arterial testing.
3
ANES 5903: Anesthesia Principle and Practices III
This course is a continuation of ANES 5901. It discusses the principles involved in the formulation of anesthetic plans based upon data obtained during the preoperative evaluation and includes the formulation and practices of different anesthetic plans and techniques as related to specific surgical procedures and pathophysiology.
2
ANES 5102: Student Lecture Series II
This course is a continuation of ANES 5101.
1
ANES 5107: Internship
The student will complete 80 hours of internship in an area of interest within a healthcare organization outside of their regular places of employment. The final product of this internship is an in-depth SWOT analysis of the unit or healthcare organization. The internship site requires prior MHSc faculty approval.
5
ANES 5603: Applied Physiology for Anesthesia Practice III
The course is a continuation of ANES 5602. Pathophysiology in a systems approach-cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, metabolic, and endocrine will be covered. Special emphasis will be applied to those systems that affect evaluation and planning for anesthesia and that are affected by administration of anesthesia.
2
Total: 18

Minimum clinical experience: 144 hours (anesthesia rotations in hospital)

Pediatric Advanced Cardiac Lifesaving will be obtained during this semester.

Semester V

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 6001: Clinical Anesthesia III
Encompasses the student’s clinical experience in required rotations through all sub-specialty areas of anesthesia. Clinical rotations are assigned in two-week and four-week intervals and will require being on-call during some nights and weekends. Clinical practice of anesthesia is gained through one-on-one supervised instruction in the operating room and other ancillary anesthetizing locations. Monthly required readings are assigned. Monthly comprehensive examinations are administered. Each course’s grade is composed of clinical evaluations and comprehensive examination scores.
13
Total: 13

Minimum clinical experience: 675 hours (anesthesia rotations in hospital)

Semester VI

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 6002: Clinical Anesthesia IV
This course is a continuation of ANES 6001. Encompasses the student’s clinical experience in required rotations through all sub-specialty areas of anesthesia. Clinical rotations are assigned in two-week and four-week intervals and will require being on-call during some nights and weekends. Clinical practice of anesthesia is gained through one-on-one supervised instruction in the operating room and other ancillary anesthetizing locations. Monthly required readings are assigned. Monthly comprehensive examinations are administered. Each course’s grade is composed of clinical evaluations and comprehensive examination scores.
15
ANES 6110: Anesthesia Review
Lectures, required readings, and discussions with faculty members, visiting faculty members, and current residents on clinical and research topics. Includes correlation of case management and complications.
2
Total: 17

Minimum clinical experience: 675 hours (anesthesia rotations in hospital)

Semester VII

Course Title & Description Credit Hours
ANES 6003: Clinical Anesthesia V
This course is a continuation of ANES 6002. Encompasses the student’s clinical experience in required rotations through all sub-specialty areas of anesthesia. Clinical rotations are assigned in two-week and four-week intervals and will require being on-call during some nights and weekends. Clinical practice of anesthesia is gained through one-on-one supervised instruction in the operating room and other ancillary anesthetizing locations. Monthly required readings are assigned. Monthly comprehensive examinations are administered. Each course’s grade is composed of clinical evaluations and comprehensive examination scores.
12
Total: 12

Minimum clinical experience: 356 hours (anesthesia rotations in hospital)

Curriculum is subject to change as directed by the department.

National Credentialing Examination Performance 99.10%
Job Placement 100%
Attrition 9.50%
National Credentialing Examination Performance 100%
Job Placement 100%
Retention 100%
National Credentialing Examination Performance 100%
Job Placement 100%
Retention 90.63%
Attrition 9.37%

*All program statistics above represent 3-year averages (2020-2022)

 

PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE DISCLOSURE/NOTIFICATION STATEMENT

 

Degree Title (Concentration)

Level

Anesthesia

Master

PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

This Disclosure is strictly limited to NSU’s determination of whether the Master of Science in Anesthesia (the “Program”), if successfully completed, would be sufficient to meet the educational requirements for licensure or certification in a State, as defined as 34 C.F.R. § 600.2. 

 

NOTE: This Disclosure does not provide any guarantee that any particular State Licensure entity will approve or deny your application for certification or professional licensure. Furthermore, this Disclosure does not account for changes in state law or regulations that may affect your application for certification or licensure or occur after this disclosure has been made. If your career plans include pursuing professional licensure or certification in your chosen field, it is important to become educated on the credentialing requirements of the state in which you hope to practice by contacting the state’s licensure entity. 

 

In accordance with 34 C.F.R. § 668.43, NSU has determined whether the Program satisfies State educational requirements for licensure as follows:

PROGRAM MEETS EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

 

States not allowing CAAs to practice

The Program meets all educational requirements in all states where Certified Anesthesiologist Assistants (CAAs) can currently practice. CAAs can currently practice in the following states:

Alabama

Colorado

Florida

Georgia

Indiana

Kansas

Michigan

Missouri

Nevada

New Mexico

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

South Carolina

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Washington

Wisconsin

As well as the District of Columbia

 

  CAAs are currently not allowed to practice in any states other than the ones listed in the adjacent column. 

 

In the state of Kentucky, CAAs are only allowed to practice if they also hold a Certification as a Physician Assistant. 

 

 

State licensure or certification requirements can vary from state to state, depending on each State’s laws and regulations. The State licensure entities are responsible for overseeing the educational and non-educational requirements for licensure or certification for their State.

 

We encourage all enrolled students and prospective students to contact their applicable State licensure entities to familiarize themselves with the specific professional licensure or certification requirements. For information on how to contact State licensure entities, please visit the U.S. Department of Education State Contacts webpage at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/contacts/state/index.html?src=contact-us

 

If you have trouble obtaining the information you need, or if you have any other questions regarding certification, please contact Dr. Robert Wagner at rwagner@nova.edu for assistance.

Frequently Asked Questions

The specific job descriptions and duties of AAs may differ according to geographic area and local practice. State law or board of medicine regulations or guidelines may further define the job descriptions of AAs. AAs practice under the direction of a qualified anesthesiologist.

The AA's functions include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Making the initial approach to a patient of any age in any setting to obtain a preliminary preanesthetic health history, perform an appropriate preanesthetic physical examination and record pertinent data in an organized and legible manner for review by an anesthesiologist. These activities help to define the patient's current physical status as it relates to the planned anesthetic.
  • Performing or assisting in the conduct of diagnostic laboratory and related studies as appropriate, such as drawing arterial and venous blood samples.
  • Establishing noninvasive and invasive routine monitoring modalities as delegated by the responsible anesthesiologist.
  • AAs are permitted to perform regional anesthesia techniques.
  • Assisting in the application and interpretation of advanced monitoring techniques such as pulmonary artery catheterization, electroencephalographic spectral analysis, echocardiography and evoked potentials.
  • Assisting in inducing, maintaining and altering anesthesia levels, administering adjunctive treatment and providing continuity of anesthetic care into and during the postoperative recovery period.
  • Assisting in the use of advanced life support techniques such as high frequency ventilation and intra-arterial cardiovascular assist devices.
  • Assisting in making postanesthesia patient rounds by recording patient progress notes, compiling and recording case summaries and by transcribing standing and specific orders.
  • Performing evaluation and treatment procedures essential to responding to life-threatening situations, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, on the basis of established protocols (basic life support, advance cardiac life support, and pediatric advanced life support).
  • Assisting in the performance of duties in intensive care units, pain clinics and other settings, as appropriate.
  • Training and supervising personnel in the calibration, trouble shooting and use of patient monitors.
  • Performing delegated administrative duties in an anesthesiology practice or anesthesiology department in such areas as the management of personnel, supplies and devices.
  • Assisting in the clinical instruction of others.
The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredits AA training programs.
The National Commission for Certification of Anesthesiologist Assistants (NCCAA) was founded in July 1989 to develop and administer the certification process for AAs in the United States.
Graduates or senior students in an AA educational program that has been accredited by the CAAHEP may apply for initial certification. Initial certification is awarded to an AA who has successfully completed the Certifying Examination for Anesthesiologist Assistants administered by NCCAA in collaboration with the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). Certified AAs are permitted to use the designation AA-C to indicate that they are currently certified
Yes. In order to maintain certification after passing the initial examination, AAs must submit documentation to NCCAA that they have completed 40 hours of continuing medical education (CME) every two years. In addition, every six years they must pass the Examination for Continued Demonstration of Qualifications (CDQ).
The use of AAs within the anesthesia care team across the country is a dynamic and evolving process. Therefore, in order to get the latest and most accurate information, please contact your state board of medicine or the American Academy of Anesthesiologist Assistants.

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