Pursue Top-Level Health Care Leadership

Elevate your expertise and role as a health care practitioner, executive-level administrator or professor by learning from the profession’s forward-thinking health care leaders — each with extensive clinician experience.

The rigorous NSU Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.) curriculum builds the advanced analytical and conceptual capabilities you’ll need to successfully navigate today’s most critical health care challenges or to qualify for coveted academic appointments in your professional specialty.

Build the stand-out academic credentials to lead hospitals, health systems, public agencies or pursue high-profile university professor or dean roles.

Apply Now Request Info

 

NSU’s Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.): Three Rewarding Concentrations

Education in Health Care

If academia is your passion, gain the credentials to pursue post-secondary teaching in your professional specialty, as well as pursue higher-level director and dean roles.

Global Health

Make your mark on the world: lead teams, research and educate others with new expertise in global policy, international health organizations, governments, and specific populations.

Telehealth

Telehealth is hot, and as tracked by the American Medical Association, “growing at 53% - faster than any other place of care.” Those with the skills to spearhead this skyrocketing sector will be in demand.

(Source)

Testimonials

Your Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.) Opens More Career Doors

This is the ideal next step to boost your career influence and earnings as a physician assistant, physical therapist, respiratory therapist, radiologic or ultrasound technologist, nurse, nurse practitioner, public health professional or as a professional in other health care professions.

Career Role Opportunities Median Annual Wage (2018)
Instructor Work in universities, community colleges, other professional post-secondary schools $97,370
Health care manager, administrators or executive Manage a hospital department; a facility; or an entire organization as part of the executive team. $99,730
Clinical Researcher Work in universities, hospitals, government labs or private industry $84,810

Sources:

Quick Facts

Delivery Options

Online plus one-week summer seminar, attended twice during your program of study.

Start Dates

Start in January, April, July or September. See application deadlines for specific start dates.

Tuition

Tuition for the degree program is $655 per credit hour.

Credit Hours

The Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.) degree is 55 credit hours.

Online Delivery: No Career Interruption.

The program is delivered primarily online, along with internship, practicum, doctoral analysis and two one-week, on-campus institute residencies that are required during the course of the program.

Get more details

Why Choose NSU?

  • Fully accredited programs
  • Empirically-based
  • Online delivery: won’t interrupt your career
  • Complete internships in your specific area of interest
  • No GRE required

Request Info

Prefer to speak with someone directly?

Email Joykrystyna Mance, your Admissions Counselor, or call her at (954) 262-1114.

Download Resources

Download
Handbook
Download
Doctor of Health Sciences Brochure

Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.): Program Details

The Office of Admissions processes applications on a rolling admission basis throughout the year. Applicants can apply for admission for any one of four starting dates during any academic year: January, April, July, and September. Each term runs for 12 weeks. Admission deadlines for submitted application and required documents are as follows:

Application Deadlines by Term

  • Spring: December 2 - March 1
  • Summer: March 2 - June 1
  • Fall: June 2 - August 15
  • Winter: August 16 - December 1

Before the applicant can be reviewed for possible admission, the following must be submitted:

Send transcripts and all required documents to:

Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
College of Health Care Sciences
Health Science Doctoral Admissions
P.O. Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33329-9905

  • Official and final transcripts from all previously attended undergraduate, professional, and graduate institutions of higher learning. Conferral degree and conferral date must be on the transcript(s) from where you earned a degree.
  • All coursework from international institution(s), Applicant is responsible for contacting one of the evaluation services listed here. The evaluation must be course by course including a cumulative GPA The official evaluation must be sent directly from the evaluation service to the NSU EPS address shown above for all documents:

    Josef Silny & Associates, Inc.
    International Education Consultants
    7101 SW 102nd Avenue
    Miami, FL 33173
    Phone: (305) 273-1616
    Fax: (305) 273-1338
    https://www.jsilny.org/

    Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc.
    P.O. Box 415070
    Milwaukee, WI 53203
    (414) 289-3400
    www.ece.org

    World Education Services, Inc.
    P.O. Box 745
    Old Chelsea Station
    New York, NY 10113-0745
    (212) 966-6311
    www.wes.org

  • Copy of national allied health professional certification or licensure, if applicable.
  • Copy of current state licensure, registration or certification.
  • Two "Evaluation Forms" from a supervising physician or manager. These forms are supplied in the application package from the program. Additional letters may be requested by the program after initial review of application, if so warranted.

    Non-clinical applicants (health administrators) only - must also include a letter of recommendation from a supervisor describing their position in the organization and the scope and duration of their responsibility, a personal statement describing their career goals, and an organizational chart. (This is not required for clinically licensed, registered, or certified applicants or for public health practitioners with an MPH). Clinically-qualified applicants should include a copy of their registration, certification and/ or licensure.
  • An up-to-date resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV).
  • Personal interview with Committee on Admissions MAY be required in some cases. Phone interview and/or advisement may be substituted upon approval.
  1. Prior to matriculation, applicants must have completed a master's degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  2. Applicants must demonstrate a cumulative master's degree GPA at or above a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale to be eligible for regular admission.
  3. Prior health care experience is required and is strongly considered in the admissions process. The D.H.Sc is a post professional degree designed for health practitioners, public health professionals, and health care administrators from a wide variety of disciplines. The commonality exhibited by our students is the expert practice of a recognized health occupation at a professional level, or five years of administrative experience in a health care organization with progressively increasing responsibilities over that time frame.
    The successful applicant's health profession may emphasize delivery of services to individual clients (e.g., PA, PT, RN, LCSW, etc.) or be population-based (MPH, MHA). An appropriate level of professional practice is generally recognized by either health professions licensure (e.g., RN, PT), a national certification or registration (e.g., PA-C, RVT, RRT, CRNA, FACHE), a recognized health professions academic credential (e.g., M.P.H., M.S.N., M.S.W., M.H.A., M.B.A.), or a combination of the above. The successful administrative (non-clinical) applicant will demonstrate at least five years of professional administrative experience with increasing levels of responsibility in a health care setting. Professional experience will be documented by an organizational chart demonstrating the applicant's position within the organization and a letter of recommendation from a supervisor attesting to the applicant's level of responsibility within the organization. Health care administrators will also need to submit a statement concerning their career and professional goals within the health care environment. Fellowship or certification by a nationally-recognized health certifying body (FACHE, etc.) is desirable. Possession of an appropriate master's degree is also necessary.
    All questions regarding the appropriateness of an applicant's qualifications for admission can be discussed with the department chair or program director on an informal basis, but the official recommendations are made by the Committee on Admissions to the dean of the College of Health Care Sciences, who makes the final determination. Successful past applicants and graduates have included physicians, dentists, nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, physician assistants, master's degree-level social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, dental hygienists, and athletic trainers. We have recently expanded the program to include health care administrators, and our graduates now include a hospital CEO and an assistant Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service.
  4. All applicants must show evidence of computer skills through coursework or self study prior to the end of the first term. Students may obtain instruction through the NSU Student Computer Laboratory, the D.H.Sc. online Orientation, or other training facilities.

Send your transcripts and evaluations to NSU's Enrollment Processing Services at:

Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services
3301 College Avenue
P.O. Box 299000
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905

Please note, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not currently required for the DHSc Program. The GRE is required prior to admission to the PhD program.

Generalist Curriculum

The generalist D.H.Sc. program requires completion of a minimum of 61 semester hours of coursework. This includes 48 semester hours didactic coursework, 11 semester hours practical coursework, and 2 semester hours for the Doctoral Objective Analysis.

During the generalist course of study, the student must complete a practicum and internship approved by the D.H.Sc program director and practicum faculty members in an area of health care including, but not limited to, health care leadership, education, policy or delivery.

At the standard pace established by the program, the course of study can be completed in three years. It is required that all coursework be completed within seven years.

Core Courses - Block 1

Four of the following are required; either DHS 8090 or DHS 9095 may fulfill the Health Policy requirement. Either 8040 or 8045 will fulfill the Ethics requirement. You must complete 1 policy and 1 ethics course, unless you obtain program director approval. Courses not taken as requirements may be used as electives.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8000: Clinical Competencies in the Delivery of Health Care to Diverse and Special Populations

This course focuses on issues and information relating to the general epidemiological concerns, health care disparities and specific health and disease issues involved in the care of both culturally-based diverse populations (African American, Native America, Asian and Asian sub-populations, and Latino-Hispanic populations); and other non-ethnic special populations (homeless, uninsured, indigent, disabled, incarcerated, rural, inner-city, GLBT, geriatric, pediatric and others.

4

DHS 8030: Community Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to work with communities to improve health status of the community. Major topics will include health promotion and disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the "Healthy People 2020" initiatives.

4

DHS 8040: Professionalism and Health Care Ethics

This course is an in depth study of the concepts of health care ethics. The course of study analyzes the differences between ethics and law and examines the core values and beliefs of medical professionalism. Methods of ethical analysis and review of current case studies will be used in critical discussions of ethical dilemmas faced by health care personnel in areas such as cloning, organ transplantation, and the implications of the Human Genome Project. The student will explore the personal values, professional standards, and institutional guidelines which define the roles and responsibilities of the health care practitioner.

4

DHS 8090: Health Policy, Planning and Management

This course critically examines the dynamics of healthcare in the U.S. The student is expected to analyze the healthcare industry and contrast non-profit and for-profit healthcare delivery systems. A critical exploration of the ramifications of healthcare reform and the impact on institutions and individuals will be undertaken. The concepts of cost containment, and long-term care will be analyzed.

4

DHS 8095: Global Health Policy

Globalization affects all sectors including health care and understanding the key policy issues is essential in the study of global health. This course, taught from a clinical perspective, examines the health policy issues confronting international health organizations, governments and specific populations. It reviews the processes that influence the development and implementation of policies, and examines specific topics related to HIV/AIDS, poverty/nutrition, infectious disease, smoking, concerns of women and children and other global major health concerns.

4

DHS 8110: Community Environmental and Occupational Health

Issues such as air and water quality and waste management will be examined. OSHA will be examined and analyzed for its impact on health and health care. Trends in environmental and occupational health legislation will be examined for their impact potential.

4

Core Courses - Block 2

Two of the following courses are required. The other courses may be omitted or used as electives.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8400: Global Health Issues

Global healthcare is an emerging priority for health professional education programs, and clinical practice. It is essential for all healthcare professionals to understand the impact of global health issues on health care and international economic stability. This course explores the many facets of global health to expose the student to the complexity of the concepts that impact healthcare in developing and developed countries.

4

HSP 9006: Evidence-Based Medical Practice

This course provides a working knowledge of evidence based medicine. Cases will be used as the backbone of this course to assist the student in analyzing data to justify the treatments used in clinical practice. Students will also learn how to critically appraise the literature, evaluate diagnostic test performance, design clinical pathways and standards of care, and implement evidenced based medicine findings in their own clinical or administrative setting.

4

DHS 8750: Patient Safety

Leadership plays a key role in adopting practices to promote patient safety and leaders should have the skills necessary to be effective in the implementation of these practices. This course will focus on patient safety through a study of safety-oriented leadership, organizational culture, human factors, decision making science, communication, and a systems approach to health care delivery. Current best practice models and the latest professional literature emphasizing patient safety will be featured.

4

DHS 8190: Health Care Education

This course explores the various theories and applications of adult education in the practice of training, pre-professional education, and post-professional education of medical personnel. Critical analysis of the different methods of teaching and training healthcare professionals is accomplished through discussion, research, investigation, journal development and assignments.

4

DHS 8800: Health Care Informatics

This course will focus on available and future methodologies and technologies for the processing, archiving, analysis and transmission of data, information, and knowledge in the medical and healthcare setting.

4

DHS 8810: Global Epidemiology

This course emphasizes the underlying concepts of the epidemiologic approach as it relates to pertinent global health issues. The student will be introduced to principles and methods of epidemiologic research. These include study designs, measures of frequency, association, impact and sources of error. Application to global health and public health strategies for disease prevention, surveillance and controls are discussed.

4

Experiential (All Required)

All courses in this block are required, total is 11 credit hours.

Note: Students are required to register for DHS 8125 in their second term in the program. DHS 8130 is a prerequisite for DHS 8140, consequently, the courses may not be taken concurrently.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8125: Preparation Forum

Students should enroll in this course within one to two semesters of matriculation into the DHSc program.

This is a 1-credit course in which students work closely in a one-on-one fashion with the course instructor/mentor to develop appropriate learning objectives and experiential plans for the internship (8130) and a substantial developmental project for the practicum (8140). Together, the internship and practicum form the capstone of the program. Attention is also paid to appropriate preparation for the form and style of the written deliverables of the internship and practicum and appropriate timelines for completion. Successful completion of 8125 will include the following: completion of APA style quizzes, approval of topic for DHS 8130 at least one semester prior to enrollment, approval of topic for DHS 8140 one to two semesters prior to enrollment, and completion of an error-free proposal for 8140 at least one to two semester prior to enrollment. Students will be continuously enrolled in 8125 until all three tasks are accomplished

1

DHS 8130: Internship

This course is the capstone of the program. The student will perform an internship at a community health care institution, clinic, educational facility, etc., which is approved in the DHS 8125 course at least one semester prior to enrolling in DHS 8130. The student should spend a minimum of 80 clock-hours learning skills from a mentor. Examples of acceptable internship experiences include teaching assistantships to learn on-site or online teaching skills, volunteering at non-profit organizations to learn about particular topics in health promotion and disease prevention, or shadowing an executive to learn leadership and executive skills among other experiences. Students on the global track must have an internship experience that has an international basis. The student will write a report that describes the institution, defines the population served, and details the health promotion activities observed. A critical evaluation should be made that details strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to the institution in order to analyze if the skills delineated were able to be learned.

5

DHS 8140: Practicum

The practicum is a written project that is developmental in nature. The practicum project must be approved in the DHS 8125 course one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. Enrollment in the practicum course must be preceded by a proposal that contains the project idea and a preliminary literature review, which will be written in the DHS 8125 course at least one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. The student will be required to choose a health promotion topic and create a health promotion program or educational resource that can be used for a community education program. An implementation and evaluation plan must be included in the final product. Examples of appropriate educational resources include developing a presentation for a national conference, developing a presentation for an in-service, or developing a course curriculum. Students on the global track must have an international basis for the project.

5

Summer Residential Institutes (All Required)

All courses in this block are required, total is 12 credit hours.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8010: Statistics and Research Methods

Students should enroll in this course within one to two semesters of matriculation into the DHSc program.

This course allows the student to develop an understanding through critical analysis of the basic research methods utilized in healthcare. Students will be taught how to critically analyze medical information and perform effective literature reviews.

4

DHS 8080: Conflict Resolution in Health Care

This course examines and analyzes the nature and dynamics of human conflict within civil societies. Emphasis is placed upon conflicts within and among governments and public sector agencies and between the health provider, patients and medical institutions. Students will be expected to take an active role in the course and develop their own strategies for dealing with conflict. A paper will be required that details and analyzes a conflict situation in the student's work or other environment and how the conflict was resolved.

4

DHS 8170: Leadership in Health Care

This course explores the various methods of leadership and management, both in and out of healthcare, and their impact on productivity, profitability and employee satisfaction. Critical analysis of the different types of leadership and management theories is given and the need for developing a leadership plan is explored. The student is expected to gain knowledge of the various types of leaders and systems and will be required to research and develop a paper on a specific leadership topic.

4

Electives

Three of the following should be taken. Block 1 and Block 2 courses may be substituted for these courses. Please check with the program.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8100: Alternative and Complementary Medicine

This course examines and analyzes alternative and complimentary medicine and their impact on the healthcare industry. The approach to the subject is to present selected alternative and complimentary medicine fields in an informative, non-judgmental format.

4

DHS 8180: Medical Writing

This course examines in practical terms the elements required for the successful publication of a journal article or clinical case review. Methods of document preparation, proper word and punctuation use, and the requirements for authors of biomedical journal articles will be discussed.

4

DHS 8200: Independent Study A

The course is a self-directed, faculty-supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised study and will follow the approved learning contract for successful completion of the course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level course of study.

1-4

DHS 8250: Independent Study B

This course is a self-directed, faculty supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level of study.

1-4

DHS 8700: Comparative International Health Systems

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles, structure, and function of international health systems through a comparative analysis of various countries' health care systems. The course will explore how national systems have evolved and how countries confront the emerging issues in healthcare. The course will explore and develop a systematic comparative analysis of the evolution, administrative structures, societal choices, financing, and provision of health care services in underdeveloped, developing, and developed countries.

4

DHS 8775: Survey of Health Law

This course is designed to introduce DHSc students to health law, or law as it affects the professionals and institutions that deliver health care in the United States. The course focuses on the traditional areas of concern for courses on health law, including: 1) access to health care; 2) the cost of health care; 3) the quality of health care; and 4) protection of the person of the patient.

4

DHS 8835: Telepresence

Telehealth involves any technology mediated communication that facilitates health services, such as the exchange of information in coordinating patient care. Progress with telehealth development is progressing rapidly, and health care professionals who are tele practitioners require a skill set specific to the delivery of health care via technology. This course explores the delivery of health care via technology, and examines the considerations necessary for telehealth encounters and delivery. The course focuses on telepresence, and special considerations in the use of technology for health care delivery. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply concepts to telehealth encounters that promote positive patient encounters and outcomes when utilizing a telehealth platform for delivery of care.

4

DHS 8900: Narrative Medicine

There is great value in listening to patient narratives and reflecting upon what is communicated through these stories about health, illness, suffering, and recovery. In this course, students will explore written forms of patient narratives as well as multimedia presentations, movies, music, song and visual arts to improve their understanding patient experiences. Students will learn how to enhance their own listening, self-reflection and communication skills, and in the process, they will develop narrative competencies that emphasize empathy, compassion and other affective components of quality care. The course will explore ways in which a study of the medical humanities contributes to a deeper understanding of personal and social features that affect the quality of patient care.

4

Any additional transfer credits.

(Up to 8 hours of Doctoral Level coursework may be transferred)

Capstone (Required)

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8120: Doctoral Analysis

In this faculty-supervised project, and the capstone of the program, the student will develop a paper using the objectives from the core courses and 1 elective as guidelines and references to form the basis of the paper. This will require research in to teaching and learning methods as well as online and in class comparisons. The outcome or final product will be an in-depth analysis of the information presented and the knowledge gained during the doctoral program. This paper will also include methods for improving the program of study in the DHSc and detailed methods to be used to deliver the proposed changes.

2

Education in the Health Care Professions Concentration

The Education in the Health Care Professions Concentration is designed to provide students with the opportunity to meet the personal and/or professional goals of gaining requisite knowledge/skills to be able to perform in an academic arena. The goal of the Education in the Health Care Professions Concentration fosters an in-depth application of knowledge and skills, inquiry and research, problem solving, collaboration and communication, professional development, higher order thinking skills, and ethical conduct.

EHP Concentration - Block 1

Four of the following are required for the general curriculum. DHS 8196 and DHS 8197 are required for the concentration.

Courses selected must also include one ethics course (DHS 8040 or DHS 8045) and one policy course (DHS 8090 or DHS 8095)

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8196: Theories and Principles for Health Care Educators

This course explores some of the major learning theories that are utilized in Health Profession Programs with emphasis on adult learning theory. The use of Bloom's Taxonomy in creating curriculums is explored. Students will be exposed to various methods of delivering material to be learned in their respective health discipline. The knowledge gainedi n this course will enhance the seasoned instructor and give invaluable insight and guidance to those transitioning from clinical practice to education in the health professions.

4

DHS 8197: Traditional and Competency-Based Curriculum and Implementation

The course will expose students to the traditional tenets of curriculum development and the facets of curriculum development of the aspects of competency-based instruction. Students will gain knowledge in the area of instructional implementation in the education of health care professionals. Subject matter will include but not be limited to student assessment, utilization of technology in education, course development, writing test questions that accurately assess learning outcomes, incorporating simulation methods and problem-based learning.

4

DHS 8000: Clinical Competencies in the Delivery of Health Care to Diverse and Special Populations

This course focuses on issues and information relating to the general epidemiological concerns, health care disparities and specific health and disease issues involved in the care of both culturally-based diverse populations (African American, Native America, Asian and Asian sub-populations, and Latino-Hispanic populations); and other non-ethnic special populations (homeless, uninsured, indigent, disabled, incarcerated, rural, inner-city, GLBT, geriatric, pediatric and others.

4

DHS 8030: Community Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to work with communities to improve health status of the community. Major topics will include health promotion and disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the "Healthy People 2020" initiatives.

4

DHS 8040: Professionalism and Health Care Ethics

This course is an in depth study of the concepts of health care ethics. The course of study analyzes the differences between ethics and law and examines the core values and beliefs of medical professionalism. Methods of ethical analysis and review of current case studies will be used in critical discussions of ethical dilemmas faced by health care personnel in areas such as cloning, organ transplantation, and the implications of the Human Genome Project. The student will explore the personal values, professional standards, and institutional guidelines which define the roles and responsibilities of the health care practitioner.

4

DHS 8045: The Influence of Ethics and Culture on Global Health

Technology, research, and advancement of health care interventions have produced impressive improvements in health outcomes for many. Unfortunately, these advancements have also lead to inequalities in health status within and between countries, creating growing global ethical dilemmas. The world is faced with new challenges such as the potential for pandemics, an aging population, a diminishing healthcare workforce, and the stresses of determining resource allocation. With these challenges comes a need to better understand the process of ethical reasoning and resolution as this will be paramount for the development and maintenance of global health. Another dimension that must be considered in ethical decision-making is the influencing factors of culture. Culture comprises the political, social, economic, religious, and ethnic norms and values of a society. Culture is instrumental in shaping bioethical policy worldwide, which necessitates its inclusion and consideration in all global ethic discussions. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles and theory of ethics as applied to global health, and how culture influences ethical decision-making. The course will examine some of the primary theories and principles in healthcare ethics including virtue, deontology, utilitarian, autonomy, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. The course will explore many prominent global health issues and exemplify how greater knowledge and understanding of global ethics and culture is vital to effective and sound decision-making. Topics that will be discussed in the course include ethical issues related to: pandemic preparedness, end of life, human organ transplantation, clinical research in developing countries, human rights, resource allocation, and the effects of globalization on world health. It is anticipated that students will bring their own ethical dilemmas arising from their own experiences, culture, and practice.

4

DHS 8090: Health Policy, Planning and Management

This course critically examines the dynamics of healthcare in the U.S. The student is expected to analyze the healthcare industry and contrast non-profit and for-profit healthcare delivery systems. A critical exploration of the ramifications of healthcare reform and the impact on institutions and individuals will be undertaken. The concepts of cost containment, and long-term care will be analyzed.

4

DHS 8095: Global Health Policy

Globalization affects all sectors including health care and understanding the key policy issues is essential in the study of global health. This course, taught from a clinical perspective, examines the health policy issues confronting international health organizations, governments and specific populations. It reviews the processes that influence the development and implementation of policies, and examines specific topics related to HIV/AIDS, poverty/nutrition, infectious disease, smoking, concerns of women and children and other global major health concerns.

4

DHS 8110: Community Environmental and Occupational Health

Issues such as air and water quality and waste management will be examined. OSHA will be examined and analyzed for its impact on health and health care. Trends in environmental and occupational health legislation will be examined for their impact potential.

4

EHP Concentration - Block 2

DHS 8190 is required for the Education in the Health Professions Concentration. Any additional courses may be used as electives.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8190: Health Care Education

This course explores the various theories and applications of adult education in the practice of training, pre-professional education, and post-professional education of medical personnel. Critical analysis of the different methods of teaching and training healthcare professionals is accomplished through discussion, research, investigation, journal development and assignments.

4

DHS 8400: Global Health Issues

Global healthcare is an emerging priority for health professional education programs, and clinical practice. It is essential for all healthcare professionals to understand the impact of global health issues on health care and international economic stability. This course explores the many facets of global health to expose the student to the complexity of the concepts that impact healthcare in developing and developed countries.

4

HSP 9006: Evidence-Based Medical Practice

This course provides a working knowledge of evidence based medicine. Cases will be used as the backbone of this course to assist the student in analyzing data to justify the treatments used in clinical practice. Students will also learn how to critically appraise the literature, evaluate diagnostic test performance, design clinical pathways and standards of care, and implement evidenced based medicine findings in their own clinical or administrative setting.

4

DHS 8750: Patient Safety

Leadership plays a key role in adopting practices to promote patient safety and leaders should have the skills necessary to be effective in the implementation of these practices. This course will focus on patient safety through a study of safety-oriented leadership, organizational culture, human factors, decision making science, communication, and a systems approach to health care delivery. Current best practice models and the latest professional literature emphasizing patient safety will be featured.

4

DHS 8800: Health Care Informatics

This course will focus on available and future methodologies and technologies for the processing, archiving, analysis and transmission of data, information, and knowledge in the medical and healthcare setting.

4

DHS 8810: Global Epidemiology

This course emphasizes the underlying concepts of the epidemiologic approach as it relates to pertinent global health issues. The student will be introduced to principles and methods of epidemiologic research. These include study designs, measures of frequency, association, impact and sources of error. Application to global health and public health strategies for disease prevention, surveillance and controls are discussed.

4

Summer Residential Institutes (All Required)

All courses in this block are required, total is 12 credit hours.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8010: Statistics and Research Methods

This course allows the student to develop an understanding through critical analysis of the basic research methods utilized in healthcare. Students will be taught how to critically analyze medical information and perform effective literature reviews.

4

DHS 8080: Conflict Resolution in Health Care

This course examines and analyzes the nature and dynamics of human conflict within civil societies. Emphasis is placed upon conflicts within and among governments and public sector agencies and between the health provider, patients and medical institutions. Students will be expected to take an active role in the course and develop their own strategies for dealing with conflict. A paper will be required that details and analyzes a conflict situation in the student's work or other environment and how the conflict was resolved.

4

DHS 8170: Leadership in Health Care

This course explores the various methods of leadership and management, both in and out of healthcare, and their impact on productivity, profitability and employee satisfaction. Critical analysis of the different types of leadership and management theories is given and the need for developing a leadership plan is explored. The student is expected to gain knowledge of the various types of leaders and systems and will be required to research and develop a paper on a specific leadership topic.

4

Electives

Three of the following should be taken. Block 1 and Block 2 courses may be substituted for these courses. Please check with the program.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8195: Academic Health Program Development

This course explores the major steps to be undertaken when considering the development of new academic health programs at a college or university. Special emphasis is given to the needs assessment and how to conduct the needs assessment, Budget will be discussed and developed; the course will highlight the development of faculty and the specific qualifications of faculty needed for a particular program specialty. Emphasis will be placed on the resources needed and resources available in the targeted community. Through the completion of various projects, the student will be expected to demonstrate mastery of the subject matter via application of the material and information presented in the assigned readings, participation in the discussion board and participation in the course activities.

4

DHS 8100: Alternative and Complementary Medicine

This course examines and analyzes alternative and complimentary medicine and their impact on the healthcare industry. The approach to the subject is to present selected alternative and complimentary medicine fields in an informative, non-judgmental format.

4

DHS 8180: Medical Writing

This course examines in practical terms the elements required for the successful publication of a journal article or clinical case review. Methods of document preparation, proper word and punctuation use, and the requirements for authors of biomedical journal articles will be discussed.

4

DHS 8200: Independent Study A

The course is a self-directed, faculty-supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised study and will follow the approved learning contract for successful completion of the course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level course of study.

1-4

DHS 8250: Independent Study B

This course is a self-directed, faculty supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level of study.

1-4

DHS 8700: Comparative International Health Systems

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles, structure, and function of international health systems through a comparative analysis of various countries' health care systems. The course will explore how national systems have evolved and how countries confront the emerging issues in healthcare. The course will explore and develop a systematic comparative analysis of the evolution, administrative structures, societal choices, financing, and provision of health care services in underdeveloped, developing, and developed countries.

4

DHS 8775: Survey of Health Law

This course is designed to introduce DHSc students to health law, or law as it affects the professionals and institutions that deliver health care in the United States. The course focuses on the traditional areas of concern for courses on health law, including: 1) access to health care; 2) the cost of health care; 3) the quality of health care; and 4) protection of the person of the patient.

4

DHS 8900: Narrative Medicine

There is great value in listening to patient narratives and reflecting upon what is communicated through these stories about health, illness, suffering, and recovery. In this course, students will explore written forms of patient narratives as well as multimedia presentations, movies, music, song and visual arts to improve their understanding patient experiences. Students will learn how to enhance their own listening, self-reflection and communication skills, and in the process, they will develop narrative competencies that emphasize empathy, compassion and other affective components of quality care. The course will explore ways in which a study of the medical humanities contributes to a deeper understanding of personal and social features that affect the quality of patient care.

4

Any additional transfer credits.

(Up to 8 hours of Doctoral Level coursework may be transferred)

Global Health Concentration

The Global Health Concentration is designed for students interested in exploring health care from a global perspective. The goal of the Global Health Concentration is to prepare students for positions that involve health care leadership, research, education, administration and decision making in global environment. The global health courses help students explore health issues including but not limited to global policy, international health organizations, governments and specific populations.

GH Concentration - Block 1

Four of the following are required for the general curriculum

DHS 8045 and DHS 8095 are required for the concentration

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8045: The Influence of Ethics and Culture on Global Health

Technology, research, and advancement of health care interventions have produced impressive improvements in health outcomes for many. Unfortunately, these advancements have also lead to inequalities in health status within and between countries, creating growing global ethical dilemmas. The world is faced with new challenges such as the potential for pandemics, an aging population, a diminishing healthcare workforce, and the stresses of determining resource allocation. With these challenges comes a need to better understand the process of ethical reasoning and resolution as this will be paramount for the development and maintenance of global health. Another dimension that must be considered in ethical decision-making is the influencing factors of culture. Culture comprises the political, social, economic, religious, and ethnic norms and values of a society. Culture is instrumental in shaping bioethical policy worldwide, which necessitates its inclusion and consideration in all global ethic discussions. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles and theory of ethics as applied to global health, and how culture influences ethical decision-making. The course will examine some of the primary theories and principles in healthcare ethics including virtue, deontology, utilitarian, autonomy, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. The course will explore many prominent global health issues and exemplify how greater knowledge and understanding of global ethics and culture is vital to effective and sound decision-making. Topics that will be discussed in the course include ethical issues related to: pandemic preparedness, end of life, human organ transplantation, clinical research in developing countries, human rights, resource allocation, and the effects of globalization on world health. It is anticipated that students will bring their own ethical dilemmas arising from their own experiences, culture, and practice.

4

DHS 8095: Global Health Policy

Globalization affects all sectors including health care and understanding the key policy issues is essential in the study of global health. This course, taught from a clinical perspective, examines the health policy issues confronting international health organizations, governments and specific populations. It reviews the processes that influence the development and implementation of policies, and examines specific topics related to HIV/AIDS, poverty/nutrition, infectious disease, smoking, concerns of women and children and other global major health concerns.

4

DHS 8000: Clinical Competencies in the Delivery of Health Care to Diverse and Special Populations

This course focuses on issues and information relating to the general epidemiological concerns, health care disparities and specific health and disease issues involved in the care of both culturally-based diverse populations (African American, Native America, Asian and Asian sub-populations, and Latino-Hispanic populations); and other non-ethnic special populations (homeless, uninsured, indigent, disabled, incarcerated, rural, inner-city, GLBT, geriatric, pediatric and others.

4

DHS 8030: Community Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to work with communities to improve health status of the community. Major topics will include health promotion and disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the "Healthy People 2020" initiatives.

4

DHS 8040: Professionalism and Health Care Ethics

This course is an in depth study of the concepts of health care ethics. The course of study analyzes the differences between ethics and law and examines the core values and beliefs of medical professionalism. Methods of ethical analysis and review of current case studies will be used in critical discussions of ethical dilemmas faced by health care personnel in areas such as cloning, organ transplantation, and the implications of the Human Genome Project. The student will explore the personal values, professional standards, and institutional guidelines which define the roles and responsibilities of the health care practitioner.

4

DHS 8090: Health Policy, Planning and Management

This course critically examines the dynamics of healthcare in the U.S. The student is expected to analyze the healthcare industry and contrast non-profit and for-profit healthcare delivery systems. A critical exploration of the ramifications of healthcare reform and the impact on institutions and individuals will be undertaken. The concepts of cost containment, and long-term care will be analyzed.

4

DHS 8110: Community Environmental and Occupational Health

Issues such as air and water quality and waste management will be examined. OSHA will be examined and analyzed for its impact on health and health care. Trends in environmental and occupational health legislation will be examined for their impact potential.

4

GH Concentration - Block 2

DHS 8400 and 8810 are required for the Global Health Concentration. Any additional courses may be used as electives.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8400: Global Health Issues

Global healthcare is an emerging priority for health professional education programs, and clinical practice. It is essential for all healthcare professionals to understand the impact of global health issues on health care and international economic stability. This course explores the many facets of global health to expose the student to the complexity of the concepts that impact healthcare in developing and developed countries.

4

DHS 8810: Global Epidemiology

This course emphasizes the underlying concepts of the epidemiologic approach as it relates to pertinent global health issues. The student will be introduced to principles and methods of epidemiologic research. These include study designs, measures of frequency, association, impact and sources of error. Application to global health and public health strategies for disease prevention, surveillance and controls are discussed.

4

HSP 9006: Evidence-Based Medical Practice

This course provides a working knowledge of evidence based medicine. Cases will be used as the backbone of this course to assist the student in analyzing data to justify the treatments used in clinical practice. Students will also learn how to critically appraise the literature, evaluate diagnostic test performance, design clinical pathways and standards of care, and implement evidenced based medicine findings in their own clinical or administrative setting.

4

DHS 8750: Patient Safety

Leadership plays a key role in adopting practices to promote patient safety and leaders should have the skills necessary to be effective in the implementation of these practices. This course will focus on patient safety through a study of safety-oriented leadership, organizational culture, human factors, decision making science, communication, and a systems approach to health care delivery. Current best practice models and the latest professional literature emphasizing patient safety will be featured.

4

DHS 8190: Health Care Education

This course explores the various theories and applications of adult education in the practice of training, pre-professional education, and post-professional education of medical personnel. Critical analysis of the different methods of teaching and training healthcare professionals is accomplished through discussion, research, investigation, journal development and assignments.

4

DHS 8800: Health Care Informatics

This course will focus on available and future methodologies and technologies for the processing, archiving, analysis and transmission of data, information, and knowledge in the medical and healthcare setting.

4

Experiential (All Required)

All courses in this block are required, total is 11 credit hours.

GH Note: Both the Internship and Practicum must have global health implications.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8125: Preparation Forum

Students should enroll in this course within one to two semesters of matriculation into the DHSc program.

This is a 1-credit course in which students work closely in a one-on-one fashion with the course instructor/mentor to develop appropriate learning objectives and experiential plans for the internship (8130) and a substantial developmental project for the practicum (8140). Together, the internship and practicum form the capstone of the program. Attention is also paid to appropriate preparation for the form and style of the written deliverables of the internship and practicum and appropriate timelines for completion. Successful completion of 8125 will include the following: completion of APA style quizzes, approval of topic for DHS 8130 at least one semester prior to enrollment, approval of topic for DHS 8140 one to two semesters prior to enrollment, and completion of an error-free proposal for 8140 at least one to two semester prior to enrollment. Students will be continuously enrolled in 8125 until all three tasks are accomplished

1

DHS 8130: Internship

This course is the capstone of the program. The student will perform an internship at a community health care institution, clinic, educational facility, etc., which is approved in the DHS 8125 course at least one semester prior to enrolling in DHS 8130. The student should spend a minimum of 80 clock-hours learning skills from a mentor. Examples of acceptable internship experiences include teaching assistantships to learn on-site or online teaching skills, volunteering at non-profit organizations to learn about particular topics in health promotion and disease prevention, or shadowing an executive to learn leadership and executive skills among other experiences. Students on the global track must have an internship experience that has an international basis. The student will write a report that describes the institution, defines the population served, and details the health promotion activities observed. A critical evaluation should be made that details strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to the institution in order to analyze if the skills delineated were able to be learned.

NOTE: Must have Global Health Implications

5

DHS 8140: Practicum

The practicum is a written project that is developmental in nature. The practicum project must be approved in the DHS 8125 course one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. Enrollment in the practicum course must be preceded by a proposal that contains the project idea and a preliminary literature review, which will be written in the DHS 8125 course at least one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. The student will be required to choose a health promotion topic and create a health promotion program or educational resource that can be used for a community education program. An implementation and evaluation plan must be included in the final product. Examples of appropriate educational resources include developing a presentation for a national conference, developing a presentation for an in-service, or developing a course curriculum. Students on the global track must have an international basis for the project.

NOTE: Must have Global Health Implications

5

Electives

DHS 8700 and any two additional courses are required - any additional Core 1 and Core 2 classes may also be taken.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8700: Comparative International Health Systems

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles, structure, and function of international health systems through a comparative analysis of various countries' health care systems. The course will explore how national systems have evolved and how countries confront the emerging issues in healthcare. The course will explore and develop a systematic comparative analysis of the evolution, administrative structures, societal choices, financing, and provision of health care services in underdeveloped, developing, and developed countries.

4

DHS 8100: Alternative and Complementary Medicine

This course examines and analyzes alternative and complimentary medicine and their impact on the healthcare industry. The approach to the subject is to present selected alternative and complimentary medicine fields in an informative, non-judgmental format.

4

DHS 8180: Medical Writing

This course examines in practical terms the elements required for the successful publication of a journal article or clinical case review. Methods of document preparation, proper word and punctuation use, and the requirements for authors of biomedical journal articles will be discussed.

4

DHS 8200: Independent Study A

The course is a self-directed, faculty-supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised study and will follow the approved learning contract for successful completion of the course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level course of study.

1-4

DHS 8250: Independent Study B

This course is a self-directed, faculty supervised experience for the student. The student will be required to develop a proposal regarding the topic of study, a learning contract with specific objectives and a plan of action to include methods of obtaining the information and the material produced to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the subject areas. A faculty member will be assigned to the student for the supervised course. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to explore an area of interest in the field of health care or health sciences. The secondary benefit of the course is to allow the student, with the assistance of the faculty, to develop and complete a doctoral level of study.

1-4

DHS 8775: Survey of Health Law

This course is designed to introduce DHSc students to health law, or law as it affects the professionals and institutions that deliver health care in the United States. The course focuses on the traditional areas of concern for courses on health law, including: 1) access to health care; 2) the cost of health care; 3) the quality of health care; and 4) protection of the person of the patient.

4

DHS 8900: Narrative Medicine

There is great value in listening to patient narratives and reflecting upon what is communicated through these stories about health, illness, suffering, and recovery. In this course, students will explore written forms of patient narratives as well as multimedia presentations, movies, music, song and visual arts to improve their understanding patient experiences. Students will learn how to enhance their own listening, self-reflection and communication skills, and in the process, they will develop narrative competencies that emphasize empathy, compassion and other affective components of quality care. The course will explore ways in which a study of the medical humanities contributes to a deeper understanding of personal and social features that affect the quality of patient care.

4

Any additional transfer credits.

(Up to 8 hours of Doctoral Level coursework may be transferred)

Telehealth Concentration

Telehealth Flyer

The Telehealth Concentration will be offered starting from the Winter 2018 term going forward. It consists of 12 credit hours to be taken as part of the generalist DHS curriculum.

General Information: The D.H.Sc. program requires completion of a minimum of 61 semester hours of coursework. This includes 48 semester hours didactic coursework, 11 semester hours practical coursework, and 2 semester hours for the Doctoral Objective Analysis.

During the generalist course of study, the student must complete a practicum and internship approved by the D.H.Sc program director and practicum faculty members in an area of health care including, but not limited to, health care leadership, education, policy or delivery.

At the standard pace established by the program, the course of study can be completed in three years. It is required that all coursework be completed within seven years.

Core Courses - Block 1

Four of the following are required; either DHS 8090 or DHS 9095 may fulfill the Health Policy requirement. Either 8040 or 8045 will fulfill the Ethics requirement. You must complete 1 policy and 1 ethics course, unless you obtain program director approval. Courses not taken as requirements may be used as electives.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8000: Clinical Competencies in the Delivery of Health Care to Diverse and Special Populations

This course focuses on issues and information relating to the general epidemiological concerns, health care disparities and specific health and disease issues involved in the care of both culturally-based diverse populations (African American, Native America, Asian and Asian sub-populations, and Latino-Hispanic populations); and other non-ethnic special populations (homeless, uninsured, indigent, disabled, incarcerated, rural, inner-city, GLBT, geriatric, pediatric and others.

4

DHS 8030: Community Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to work with communities to improve health status of the community. Major topics will include health promotion and disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the "Healthy People 2020" initiatives.

4

DHS 8040: Professionalism and Health Care Ethics

This course is an in depth study of the concepts of health care ethics. The course of study analyzes the differences between ethics and law and examines the core values and beliefs of medical professionalism. Methods of ethical analysis and review of current case studies will be used in critical discussions of ethical dilemmas faced by health care personnel in areas such as cloning, organ transplantation, and the implications of the Human Genome Project. The student will explore the personal values, professional standards, and institutional guidelines which define the roles and responsibilities of the health care practitioner.

4

DHS 8090: Health Policy, Planning and Management

This course critically examines the dynamics of healthcare in the U.S. The student is expected to analyze the healthcare industry and contrast non-profit and for-profit healthcare delivery systems. A critical exploration of the ramifications of healthcare reform and the impact on institutions and individuals will be undertaken. The concepts of cost containment, and long-term care will be analyzed.

4

DHS 8095: Global Health Policy

Globalization affects all sectors including health care and understanding the key policy issues is essential in the study of global health. This course, taught from a clinical perspective, examines the health policy issues confronting international health organizations, governments and specific populations. It reviews the processes that influence the development and implementation of policies, and examines specific topics related to HIV/AIDS, poverty/nutrition, infectious disease, smoking, concerns of women and children and other global major health concerns.

4

DHS 8110: Community Environmental and Occupational Health

Issues such as air and water quality and waste management will be examined. OSHA will be examined and analyzed for its impact on health and health care. Trends in environmental and occupational health legislation will be examined for their impact potential.

4

Experiential (All Required)

All courses in this block are required, total is 11 credit hours.

Note: Students are required to register for DHS 8125 in their second term in the program. DHS 8130 is a prerequisite for DHS 8140, consequently, the courses may not be taken concurrently.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8125: Preparation Forum

Students should enroll in this course within one to two semesters of matriculation into the DHSc program.

This is a 1-credit course in which students work closely in a one-on-one fashion with the course instructor/mentor to develop appropriate learning objectives and experiential plans for the internship (8130) and a substantial developmental project for the practicum (8140). Together, the internship and practicum form the capstone of the program. Attention is also paid to appropriate preparation for the form and style of the written deliverables of the internship and practicum and appropriate timelines for completion. Successful completion of 8125 will include the following: completion of APA style quizzes, approval of topic for DHS 8130 at least one semester prior to enrollment, approval of topic for DHS 8140 one to two semesters prior to enrollment, and completion of an error-free proposal for 8140 at least one to two semester prior to enrollment. Students will be continuously enrolled in 8125 until all three tasks are accomplished

1

DHS 8130: Internship

This course is the capstone of the program. The student will perform an internship at a community health care institution, clinic, educational facility, etc., which is approved in the DHS 8125 course at least one semester prior to enrolling in DHS 8130. The student should spend a minimum of 80 clock-hours learning skills from a mentor. Examples of acceptable internship experiences include teaching assistantships to learn on-site or online teaching skills, volunteering at non-profit organizations to learn about particular topics in health promotion and disease prevention, or shadowing an executive to learn leadership and executive skills among other experiences. Students on the global track must have an internship experience that has an international basis. The student will write a report that describes the institution, defines the population served, and details the health promotion activities observed. A critical evaluation should be made that details strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to the institution in order to analyze if the skills delineated were able to be learned.

NOTE: Must have Global Health Implications

5

DHS 8140: Practicum

The practicum is a written project that is developmental in nature. The practicum project must be approved in the DHS 8125 course one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. Enrollment in the practicum course must be preceded by a proposal that contains the project idea and a preliminary literature review, which will be written in the DHS 8125 course at least one to two semesters prior to enrolling in DHS 8140. The student will be required to choose a health promotion topic and create a health promotion program or educational resource that can be used for a community education program. An implementation and evaluation plan must be included in the final product. Examples of appropriate educational resources include developing a presentation for a national conference, developing a presentation for an in-service, or developing a course curriculum. Students on the global track must have an international basis for the project.

5

Telehealth Electives

All three courses must be completed for the Telehealth Concentration. If you are interested in the clinical aspect of telehealth, you may elect to take DHS 8835 - Telepresence instead of DHS 8830.

Course Name Semester Hours

DHS 8820: Telehealth Concepts, Applications and Future Trends

Telehealth involves any technology-medicated communication that facilitates health services, such as the exchange of information in coordinating patient care. This course explores the foundational concepts that supports telehealth within a health care environment, including information privacy and security standards that support health information systems and technologies. Students will examine the current applications of telehealth and propose recommendations that resolve common issues within clinical settings. The course has an emphasis on the legal and ethical considerations with implementing telehealth programs. Furthermore, students will appraise future trends by reviewing current telehealth products and anticipating upcoming innovations or practices. (Winter)

4

DHS 8825: Technological Infrastructures of Telehealth

The health industry's technology has been rapidly evolving--with telehealth placed as an area of value and growth potential. Telehealth, which involves the use of any technology in providing clinical services, requires health professionals to develop strong skills in information systems and technologies. This course introduces aspects of technology management relevant to telehealth practices. Students will discover ways in which data is captured, transmitted, stored, and retrieved. Students will learn how to uphold information security and privacy through contemporary approaches in technology management. The course presents technical concepts from a leadership perspective; learners will be able to determine the types of skills used by technology experts in the management of telehealth services or programs. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply telehealth approaches across various areas of medicine and different healthcare organizations. (Spring)

4

DHS 8830: Strategic Planning for Telehealth Programs and Services

Telehealth services utilize health information technologies and systems to facilitate healthcare operations, clinical procedures, and the exchange of health information. Healthcare organizations have found it necessary to coordinate the rapid growth of telehealth / telemedicine services by building partnerships, exploring business ventures, and launching comprehensive programs. This course examines telehealth strategies and initiatives through case study analysis and class discussions. Students will practice “hands-on” management of telehealth technologies, systems, and operations. Throughout the course, students will engage in a comprehensive strategic planning process—honing professional communication, teamwork, and customer service skills. (Summer II)

4

DHS 8835: Telepresence

Telehealth involves any technology mediated communication that facilitates health services, such as the exchange of information in coordinating patient care. Progress with telehealth development is progressing rapidly, and health care professionals who are tele practitioners require a skill set specific to the delivery of health care via technology. This course explores the delivery of health care via technology, and examines the considerations necessary for telehealth encounters and delivery. The course focuses on telepresence, and special considerations in the use of technology for health care delivery. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply concepts to telehealth encounters that promote positive patient encounters and outcomes when utilizing a telehealth platform for delivery of care. (Fall)

4

Per Credit: $671

Student Services Fee (if taking 1-3 credits): $187.50 per term

Student Services Fee (if taking 4 credits or more): $375 per term

Registration Fee: $30 per term

The program is designed to be completed in an online format. The only residency requirement is a 1-week summer seminar attended twice during your program of study. You’ll need an internet connection to access course materials and the online student center.

There is no dissertation required: it has been replaced with an internship, practicum, and the Doctoral Objective Analysis. As with most doctoral programs of study, papers compose a large portion. Many courses also require a journal to be kept, as well as discussion board postings. Keep in mind, this is an online program. The majority of communications will be in writing.

Each professor determines the need for a textbook and online readings. You will be responsible for purchasing the required text(s) for each course. Because this is a doctoral level program, primary source readings, instead of textbooks, are emphasized. Use of the NSU library is required and is available at a distance.

The online courses work very much like a classroom and you will be required to interact with the professor and the other students in your virtual classroom, as well as adhere to any assignment due dates. There is an online student center where you can post messages, questions, and have chats with classmates. You will also find the schedule, course plans, links, library resources and much more.

How much time you spend will be based on several factors to include your study style, time management, the professors methods, and your study area.

We consider one class per semester to be full time. At one class per semester, with the exception of one summer institute that will require two courses, and completing the internship or practicum while taking another course, the program can be completed in 3.5 years. At two courses per semester, a student may complete the program in just over 2 years.

Take the Next Step

Call(s) to Action